Tag Archive: Harehills

Heroes of Harehills: Local lads on a mission to raise £15,000 to support the Rohingyan Muslims

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THE TEAM: Harehills heroes, Tanveer ‘Tiki’ Latif, Sajad Sajawal, Osman Ali, Mukid Ali and Shishu Ali, who are all members of Harehills Community Aid who are aiming to raise £15,000 to help the Rohingyan Muslims aid relief

THE TEAM: Harehills heroes, Tanveer ‘Tiki’ Latif, Sajad Sajawal, Osman Ali, Mukid Ali and Shishu Ali, who are all members of Harehills Community Aid who are aiming to raise £15,000 to help the Rohingyan Muslims aid relief

 

“We are called Harehills community Aid for a reason because it’s an area which gets enough bad publicity and we want to help change this and get some positive vibes.”

A group of men from Harehills in Leeds, have set the bar high with their latest charity drive. They’re looking to raise an imposing £15,000 to help the Rohingyan Muslims who have been forced to flee the atrocities in Myanmar to Bangladesh.

The £15,000 target is a large one, but one which will go towards the aid and support to help supply necessities which are taken for granted in this country. Things like clean water, food, and medical aid are high priorities and the money raised will go towards funding this.

There are over half a million people who are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance after they have fled from the violence in Myanmar to seek safety in Bangladesh.

It is largley Rohingyan women and children who have been forced to leave, with many children being left orphaned with families and homes wrecked in the violence. This has caused international outrage and people want to take a stand.

Harehills Community Aid who have been successful with their charity work in the past raising funds for people in France in need are looking to help.

With many of them being Bangladeshi themselves, they speak of their charity campaign for the Rohingyan Aid fund. Mukid Ali explains: “We came together as a group and helped numerous smaller causes around 18-months ago.

“We helped raise funds for a charity who were going over to help out in Syria during Ramadan, and  we made a large donation towards that.

“The idea behind this current campaign came after my recent holiday in Bangladesh with my family.

“Being exposed to how many Rohingyan Muslims refugees are seeking help is heartwrenching.

“The situation is really dire over there, thousands of orphaned children, mothers and homeless people forced to run away seeking aid they so desperatley need.

“Bangladesh is already a third-year country, which is over populated and financially they have always been struggling, so they can’t cope with the influx of Rohingyans going over seeking refuge.”

Mr Ali narrated the horrors of witnessing the after effects of people facing atrocities first hand, and it had such an effect he wanted to help his native country and wanted the local community to help out he explained.

“When I came back the situation over there was that bad and hit me so hard, I decided to get us all together and do something, so we are targeting getting the community on board.

“This time we are really going for it and want to push ourselves as much as we can, we did a lot with the France Aid we did but we believe we can do more and get the community on board even more.

“We have set ourselves a really high target of £15,000, but we know this can be achieved. This will be different though as we all can’t just drive to Bangladesh like we did France, and you can’t just transport things like food and clothes because it becomes too costly.

“So, we decided that one of us will go over in person. I myself have taken that responsibility and will hand over the money.

“I will be covering the cost of this myself from my own pocket. None of what we raise will be going on my expenses, every penny we raise will be going directly to helping with the Rohingyan aid.”

Mr Ali then discusses how they are looking to raise funds for this worthy cause and the support they are already receiving from local organisations such as a college.

Mr Ali says: “We were looking at ways to raise these funds, so on the back of our incredibly successful football tournament we have set up another one for 1st January 2018 at Thomas Danby College through the help of Naved who runs the pitches there. They’ve let us use their pitches for free. They have always been really supportive and a great help we really appreciate what they do for us and our charity work.”

The group are also offering a service in which they are selling fudge cakes to the community for £10, in a service where they will be hand delivering the cakes themselves with all proceeds going directly to the fund, and this has already proved a successful fund-raising method.

“The first week we have had a lot of support from the community with this initiative with over 70 orders on cakes in the first week alone,” he says.

“People do give us encouraging words on the work we do and some people when we get there just give us donations and don’t even ask for a cake.

The Harehills Community Aid group are also looking to get local businesses on board.

“There is one already who are going to put a charity dinner on for us on the 21st of November with all proceeds going directly to our aid fund as well.

“The main thing what we want to achieve is the awareness of the plight of what these people are actually going through and that we need to do whatever we can to help them out and alleviate some of their issues.

Team mate Shishu then emphasised the importance of the community getting on board with what they are trying to achieve: “We are doing a good deed and obviously that’s great and makes us feel good, but it’s not about us it’s about helping them and making a difference to their lives.

“With this cause, knowing people from Bangladesh, along with some of us being Bangladeshi ourselves, we can’t just sit back and let this happen. We are all blessed with family and financially, so we want to stand up and help out.

“Bangladesh is a third world country which suffers with really poor financial problems and hygiene problems and it almost feels like these people are being forgotten and not being treat equally and fair because they are Muslim, and that’s not right at all.”

Mr Ali, issued a rallying call to the local people of Harehills to get behind them.

“We are all hard-working family people who really appreciate what we have, and we will be taking time out to do this and it is really important to us to do,” he says.

“It is important to emphasise how it’s not just the Asian community that’s helping. People from all different communities work together as one and stand united side by side - it’s all about community spirit.”

The Harehills Community Aid group plan to deliver the funds to Bangladesh on 15th January. If you would like to help out with this cause in anyway or purchase a fudge cake you can contact Shishu on: 07912869694 or email harehillscommunityaid@gmail.com. They do advise to order by Thursday to ensure weekend delivery.

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“Goodbye Iffy”: Tributes pour in for kind-hearted 16-year-old stabbing victim

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16-year-old Irfan Wahid died from a stab wound to the chest

Thousands turned out for the funeral of “kind-hearted” Leeds teenager, Irfan Wahid, who was stabbed to death last week.

Members of the Asian community in and around Harehills called for the support of people in “this very difficult” time for Irfan’s family.

 

16-year-old Irfan Wahid - fondly known as Iffy - was stabbed during an incident in Harehills Lane at about 15:40 PM on Friday 10th February. He later died in hospital after being attacked.

Along with his distraught friends from Carr Manor School, mourners gathered at the Bilal Mosque, with a vigil held soon after the funeral near where he was stabbed, calling for love, respect and forgiveness.

Many wore sweatshirts bearing Iffy’s name, and raised money for a charity, which will be chosen by the dead teen’s family.

Tributes continue to pour in and Iffy’s friends and family have set up a Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/justiceforiffy/?fref=ts in memory of the 16-year-old.

Now the family is urging community leaders to help educate other young people, using their son as an example, to rid themselves of rage, anger and hate within.

They say that they want to unite in solidarity against violence and that the message is to “avoid gangs, avoid knives.”

The family have also thanked the wider community for their support during this tough time.

A 16-year-old boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was remanded in custody at Leeds Crown Court after he was charged with Irfan's murder.

A further court hearing is due to take place on 23rd March.

 

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STABBING VICTIM: “He was such a nice kid – in the wrong place at the wrong time”

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“He was such a nice kid – in the wrong place at the wrong time”

16-year-old Irfan Wahid died from a stab wound to the chest

Tributes have been pouring in on the murder of a 16-year-old stabbing victim in Harehills, Leeds.

Members of the Asian community have said schoolboy Irfan Wahid was simply 'in the wrong place at the wrong time.'

Irfan, died  from a single stab wound to the chest and died in hospital after being attacked at about 15:40 GMT on Friday 10th February.

A West Yorkshire Police spokesperson said: "Detectives investigating the death of 16-year-old Irfan Wahid in Harehills, Leeds on Friday 10th February have charged a 16-year-old boy with murder and possession of a bladed article."

Another 15-year-old boy arrested on Friday on suspicion of murder has been released without charge.

The funeral took place on Thursday 16th February.

Irfan's friends have organised a vigil at 3pm Thursday 16th February on Harehills Lane

A Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/justiceforiffy/?fref=ts has been set up in memory of the 16-year-old.

Irfan’s friends have organised a peaceful vigil at 3pm on Thursday 16th February on Harehills Lane in the spot where Irfan died. They are appealing for people to 'sort out their beef' by shaking hands and making peace at the gathering.

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Party in the house: Leeds housing boss plans to celebrate-30 years

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PROUD: Ali Akbor, chief executive of Unity Homes and Enterprise will be celebrating three decades in housing

PROUD: Ali Akbor, chief executive of Unity Homes and Enterprise will be celebrating three decades in housing

The chief executive of Leeds-based housing association has spoken of his pride on the organisation’s achievements and future plans as it prepares to celebrate its 30th anniversary next year.

Unity Homes and Enterprise was set-up as a community housing association in 1987 to address the needs of black and minority ethnic communities in Leeds.

The initial focus was on Chapeltown, where it continues to have its headquarters. But over the years its activities have widened to other areas of the city including Harehills, Beeston, Holbeck and Chapel Allerton.

Its extensive work now includes supporting local entrepreneurial activity through Unity Enterprise, a subsidiary company, and helping local people to access jobs and training with assistance from Unity Employment Services.

“It is useful for organisations like us to step back from time to time to reflect on the journey we have made and our achievements,” said Ali Akbor, who will also be marking 18 years as the association’s chief executive in January.

“When I joined Unity, we managed fewer than 700 homes. We now have responsibility for more than 1,200 properties with advanced plans to increase that number by up to 200 before the end of the decade. This includes the official opening of 26 new properties in Leeds – at Hunslet and Little London – in the coming weeks.”

But Mr Akbor was keen to stress that working with partners, including Leeds City Council and the Homes and Communities Agency, to meet housing need was just one element of Unity’s drive to regenerate local communities.

“We are fiercely ambitious on behalf of the people and neighbourhoods we serve,” he explained.
“Economic, social and physical regeneration go hand in hand.

“Building high quality affordable homes is obviously fundamental to everything we do. But so too is being proactive in stimulating local business activity and helping our tenants into jobs.

“Unity Enterprise now provides 130 managed workspaces for around 80 local businesses in three centres close to Leeds city centre. And last year we helped 77 people to find work, 120 to access accredited skills training and 15 to gain work placements.”

Looking ahead to 2017, Mr Akbor said he believed the work of BME-led organisations was more ever now than for many years.

“I am immensely proud that our tenants now come from all communities and ethnic backgrounds, but we have not forgotten our roots,” he continued.

“As we look back over the three decades of Unity’s existence, we must acknowledge the advances this country has made on equality and diversity. We’ve been progressive in comparison with many other nations. But to maintain that lead, these issues must return to the top of the policy agenda where they haven’t been of late.

“The United Kingdom faces new challenges which have been exacerbated in the wake of the EU referendum. We’ve read headlines about a divided nation. We’ve witnessed an increase in anti-immigration views. Cohesion has been challenged in some areas including an increase in hate crime.

“Community housing associations like ours do make a difference, and we hope to make that difference for many years to come.”

 

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Community’s call to action: Team Harehills send off huge container of aid to Aleppo

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SUPPLIES: Clothes, water and medical aid was all donated to the cause

SUPPLIES: Clothes, water and medical aid was all donated to the cause

When one resident in Harehills put out a call for help after seeing people suffering in Aleppo, he expected some close friends and family to perhaps show some interest.

Instead, what Charlie ‘Chaz’ Mo discovered, was that a whole community wanted to show their support in whatever way they could.

In the space of just 48 hours – from the time Charlie sent out text messages to his contacts and posted an appeal on Facebook – the Aleppo Winter Appeal had gone viral.

A huge container was filled with donations in just two days, with water, medicine and clothes stacked up to the brim.

The container will now be sent off to Syria by the charity, Al Fatiha Global, who will also oversee the distribution of the aid overseas.

HUMANITARIAN: Charlie ‘Chaz’ Mo says he was amazed to see such a response to his Aleppo Winter Appeal

HUMANITARIAN: Charlie ‘Chaz’ Mo says he was amazed to see such a response to his Aleppo Winter Appeal

Speaking about the donations, Charlie said he had been overwhelmed.

“The response I got in just 48 hours was amazing,” he continued. “I am still receiving calls now from people who want to donate even more.

“We really hope this work to support the needy will continue in the long run.”

He added: “A special thank you must go to Liaqat, Riasat and Arshad Sajawal, as well as Councillor Javaid Akhtar for supporting me in this project cause.

“Thanks also to my friends, family and mostly the local community and the people that donated from all over Yorkshire.”

Charlie’s says his winter appeal was a particular success due to the decision not to accept any monetary donations.

“When money gets involved with projects, transparency comes into question and people want to see where every penny has gone,” he said.

“I much prefer to make donations myself as it not only saves time shopping around, but allows people to give as much or as little as they can.”

Away from his winter appeal, Charlie is known as somewhat of community champion and is involved in a number of projects helping the less fortunate across the city.

If you would like to donate directly to Al Fatiha Global, you can do so by visiting their website at www.alfatihaglobal.com.

TEAM EFFORT: The team managed to load a huge container of goods before it was shipped off to help people in Aleppo

TEAM EFFORT: The team managed to load a huge container of goods before it was shipped off to help people in Aleppo

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‘I am the product of Harehills’

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LEADER: Salma Arif was elected as the councillor of Harehills and Gipton with 79 per cent of the votes – the second largest majority in the city

LEADER: Salma Arif was elected as the councillor of Harehills and Gipton with 79 per cent of the votes – the second largest majority in the city

Young Leeds councillor aims to find strength in diversity

As the votes were counted earlier this month and the political embodiment of Leeds City Council was constructed for another two years, one local councillor was celebrating more than others as she was presented with the chance of continuing her proud family legacy.

At just 29-years-old Salma Arif became one of the city’s youngest councillors with victory in the Harehills and Gipton candidacy race.

Having grown up in the ‘heart of Harehills’, she has seen firsthand the issues people are facing in the local area, with education and employment central to her campaign.

Her grandfathers, Sohbat Ali and Bostan Khan, were amongst the earliest settlers in Leeds when they travelled to the area following service with the British Forces in World War Two.

The pair was instrumental in helping fellow immigrants create lives for themselves in the UK and Salma knows she has to work hard to replicate their impact.

“They have left an amazing legacy behind.  For me to even match just an ounce of that would be an accomplishment,” she said.

“I guess it's in the genes.”

With local councils continuing to be hit by cuts across the country, the job of a councillor is one which has perhaps become harder in recent times.

Salma, who received 79 per cent of the votes for her seat, insists she is up for the challenge.

“I was born in Harehills and am a product of Harehills,” she said, “now I get to represent my area.”

“To know that my neighbours can now come and see me to tell me their problems is a real privilege and I will do everything I can to help them.

“Because I come from the area, I understand what affects them and I see that as a massive advantage but also there is more pressure to perform.”

Salma was previously featured in the Asian Express after attending the Young Muslim Leadership Programme in September 2014 - a two week residential at the Oxford Centre for Islamic studies.

There she met with esteemed politicians and discussed issues surrounding diversity in the UK – lessons she hopes to utilise in her new political position.

“I’m not naive and know that I can’t change everything overnight but we need a strong voice for Harehills and Gipton and I will provide that,” she added.

“The area does not get the greatest of press but we are one of the most diverse places you will find in the city. We need to make sure these differences are not our weaknesses but our strengths.

“We can learn from each other and from my point of view, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

“My aim is to make Harehills and Gipton a better place to live for everybody.”

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Drug dealer dealt life sentence

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FIRED AT CLOSE RANGE: Masum Ahmed owed his supplier over £30,000 for heroin

FIRED AT CLOSE RANGE: Masum Ahmed owed his supplier over £30,000 for heroin

26 years for Harehills man who shot his supplier at close range

A drug dealer has been jailed for at least 26 years after murdering his drug supplier in cold blood as he sat waiting in his car.

Masum Ahmed, 20, lured Shuel Ali Hussain to Pasture Road, Harehills, and shot him at close range with a semi-automatic gun.

In order to prevent police linking him to the killing, Ahmed then pocketed Mr Hussain’s mobile phones.

Mr Hussain managed to reach a nearby shop from his car but died at the scene from his injuries before emergency services arrived.

Leeds Crown Court heard Ahmed was a successful drug dealer in his own right and earned up to £1,700 week from the drugs supplied to him by Mr Hussain.

Ahmed owed Mr Hussain over £30,000 for over a kilo of heroin and this may have been the motive for the murder.

Detective Inspector Richard Holmes, of West Yorkshire Police Homicide and Major Enquiry Team, said: “Shuel Ali Hussain’s murder was a completely unnecessary act of violence that shows the appallingly tragic consequences that can result when people are prepared to carry and use firearms.

“His murder was the subject of a comprehensive investigation which quickly led to the arrest of those involved, both in the murder itself and in attempts to cover up.

“Mr Hussain’s family have been left devastated at his sudden and violent death at such a relatively young age. We hope they will take some degree of comfort from knowing that the people involved have now had to face the consequences of their actions.

“This case clearly illustrates the human cost of the criminal use of firearms in our communities. West Yorkshire Police will continue to use all available tactics to proactively target those criminals who present this most serious of risks.”

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Tearing down taboos at Touchstone Support Centre in Harehills

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SUPPORT: Ripaljeet Kaur supports people with dementia and runs a monthly cafe where people with the condition can meet up

SUPPORT: Ripaljeet Kaur supports people with dementia and runs a monthly cafe where people with the condition can meet up

Opening doors for dementia

A BME Dementia service at Touchstone is breaking down the barriers of dementia awareness in the city with a host of initiatives and projects aimed at tackling the cultural taboo.

The Alzheimer’s Society estimates that there are currently 800,000 people with dementia in the UK with over 11,500 of those from BME (Black and minority ethnic) backgrounds.

Ripaljeet Kaur has worked as a BME dementia worker for Touchstone for the past four years. Her role is to raise awareness about the condition within a host of diverse communities.

She attends community groups and talks about dementia symptoms and the pathway to get the diagnosis and the services afterwards.

Ripaljeet does one-to-one work and supports dementia sufferers and their carers to access mainstream service and helps people who are struggling to get a diagnosis.

She said: “We’re hoping to stop the stigma and taboo in BME communities about any mental health issues.

“In the five South Asian languages, there’s no word for dementia. The closest word is ‘crazy’, so there’s a huge stigma attached to it.

“My role is to break that stigma. Dementia is an illness like anything else, and we treat it like that. It’s not age related. It’s different from when you lose memory or hearing from old age - it’s an illness that affects the brain.

“We’re pushing for an early diagnosis for people so that they can be supported in the early stages when they have the capacity to make decisions. We can’t brush this under the carpet.”

Dementia can affect anyone. It is a condition that includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language.

It is caused when the brain is damaged by diseases, such as Alzheimer’s or a series of strokes, and is progressive, meaning the symptoms will gradually get worse.

Vascular dementia is especially common in the BME (Black and Minority Ethnic) community and is caused by an impaired supply of blood to the brain, caused by a series of small strokes.

Some of the first signs of Alzheimer's disease include lapses in memory and problems with finding the right words. Other symptoms that may develop include memory problems, such as forgetting the way home from the shops, or being unable to remember names and places.

Mood changes are common, particularly as the parts of the brain that control emotions become affected by disease. People with dementia may also feel sad, frightened or angry about what is happening to them.

Communication problems can also occur, such as a decline in the ability to talk, read and write.

Ripaljeet runs a Hamari Yaadain dementia cafe every month at Touchstone on Harehills Avenue in Leeds. The support group is communicated through the mother tongue of Punjabi, Hindi or Urdu.

People with dementia attend so that they can touch base with social workers or have their benefits checked.

People with dementia attend so that they can touch base with social workers or have their benefits checked” - “The café is attended by people with dementia and their family members for a chat over a cup of tea. They also get helpful information or advice about any issues relating to dementia and take part reminiscing activities.

Ripaljeet continued: “If people have an early diagnosis, it’s easier for them to plan their life and get their finances sorted.

“We hope people will recognise the symptoms and go straight to their GP for a memory test.

“If you don’t know much about dementia, you may think your life is ruined but dementia affects everyone differently. People have been diagnosed with dementia for 10 years but they’re still doing the things they used to do with help from a support network. People can still live well with dementia.

“In BME families, the network is usually quite large but sometimes that can be confusing for the family and the dementia sufferer because every member of the family has their own idea of what is the best way forward. That’s where we can also offer some help and find some middle ground. After all, we aim to provide a person-centred service.”

Diagnosing dementia is often difficult, particularly in the early stages. The GP is the first person to consult and they may then refer the person being diagnosed to a specialist such as a consultant.

Assessments can include conversations with the person being diagnosed and those close to them, a physical examination, memory tests and/or brain scans.

The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) is the most commonly used test for complaints of memory problems or when a diagnosis of dementia is being considered.

Becoming forgetful does not necessarily mean that you have dementia. Many of us notice that our memory becomes less reliable as we get older. It can also be a symptom of stress or depression. In rare cases, dementia-like symptoms can be caused by vitamin deficiencies or a brain tumour.

Even if the diagnosis is dementia, much can be done after a diagnosis to support someone to live well with the condition.

To find out more, please ring Ripaljeet on 0113 2192727

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Team Harehills: Putting the ‘unity’ back in community

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APPEAL: The Harehills Refugee Aid team are appealing for teams to take part in their fundraising football tournament ahead of their aid visit in the New Year

APPEAL: The Harehills Refugee Aid team are appealing for teams to take part in their fundraising football tournament ahead of their aid visit in the New Year

As refugees in Calais prepare to see in the New Year in their self-constructed camps, a team of determined fundraisers 300 miles away are readying themselves for an aid mission in 2016.

Under the banner ‘Harehills Refugee Aid’, a group of at least 12 volunteers will make the trip from Leeds to France on Wednesday 6th January, armed with multiple vanloads of supplies.

With over 20 local business pledging support, and members of the local community coming together with collections and donations, organisers say they feel the project has helped ‘unite Harehills’.

Sajad Sajawal, one of the men behind the appeal, explained: “For almost all of us, this will be the first time we go on an aid mission like this so we want it be done right.

“It started off with just eight or nine of us talking about the project and now it feels like all of Harehills is involved.

“Businesses and local residents have really got behind the project and we are still raising funds and collecting for the aid mission.”

The team are now arranging a football tournament this year to raise extra funds to purchase stock for the trip.

Held at Thomas Danby College on Sunday 27th December, 18 teams of seven, with two substitutes, will face off in the ‘Tournament of Hope’, held between 10am and 6pm.

“This is just the latest way we are trying to get people involved with the project and it is already shaping up to be a good tournament,” Sajad added.

Amongst the group travelling to Calais next year is Mukith Ali. He is one of the only volunteers to have previously carried out aid missions to France having already completed two visits in the last couple of months.

Explaining what the team were likely to expect come 6th January, he said: “You do not realise exactly how bad the conditions at these camps are until you get there.

“The last trip I went on was really rewarding and I want this group to have that same feeling, that we know we have helped some families.”

If you would like to register a team for the ‘Tournament of Hope’ please contact Tavseef Rashid on 07867 625715.

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Building for the future

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CONSTRUCTION: The mosque is expected to be completed in the spring of 2015

CONSTRUCTION: The mosque is expected to be completed in the spring of 2015

Leeds Masjid appeals for donations

The foundations are in place and the construction has begun on Leeds’ newest mosque as the Masjid-e-Quba is being developed in Harehills.

Last month, the foundation stone was laid by special guest, Hanif Jalandhari, the general secretary of Wafaq ul Madaris Al-Arabia, in front of a large crowd who gathered to witness the start of the latest development stage.

Quranic scripture was read out on site before a prayer took place, with the renowned scholar at the centre of the service.

Located on the corner of Hares Avenue and Shepherds Lane, when complete, the new building will add to current developments which already exist in two separate standing buildings.

OnTime Constructions has provided work for the frame of the building and helped save the mosque and local community more than £100,000 in costs.

Iklaak Mir, speaking on behalf of the Masjid-e-Quba, said: “We are proud of appointing the construction work to Ontime Constructions and Aihtsham Rashid.

“Aihtsham has done an outstanding job for Masjid-e-Quba and continues to put his time and effort into saving the Masjid thousands of pounds which can be used on the development of the building.

“Masjid-e-Quba cannot thank him enough for the input he has made.”

Mr Rashid is the youngest Muslim developer to independently build a Mosque from start to finish. At the laying of the foundation stone, the constructor was in attendance with his parents and said it was a proud moment to witness the iconic event.

Mr Rashid added: “I am incredibly honoured to have been presented the opportunity to build the mosque and I’m very grateful to Mr Iklaak Mir and the committee for backing me 100 per cent.

“I have dedicated my time, efforts and finances to this worthy cause and I pray that through my good intentions my late grandparents, and all my family reap the spiritual benefits of my virtuous actions.”

It is hoped that the mosque will welcome in its first guests in the spring of 2015 yet further funding is still required for the Masjid to be completed on time.

Mr Mir added: “The Masjid-e-Quba is quickly approaching its last and final stage – ‘Phase 3’ – expected to begin at the end of March 2015.

“For the project to be completed an additional £300,000 will be required and so we are appealing for people to please donate generously and help us construct this important site in Leeds.”

To date, the Masjid-e-Quba trustees say a total of £260,000 has been raised for the project. If you would like to make a donation please see information below.

MEMORY: Mr Rashid said he prays that his good intentions, will allow his late grandparents, including grandfather Mohammed Ashraf Durrani (pictured), reap the spiritual benefits of the virtuous actions

MEMORY: Mr Rashid said he prays that his good intentions, will allow his late grandparents, including grandfather Mohammed Ashraf Durrani (pictured), reap the spiritual benefits of the virtuous actions

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