Presents for the poorly: Charitable childcare spread Eid cheer


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GIFT GIVING: The team delivered Eid gifts to children at the BRI last week, pictured: (back row, l-r) Nurses Emma Walker and Joanna Jacomb; W-Childcare Director, Nazim Ali; W-Childcare Manager, Michaela Yildiz (front row, l-r) Amina Qureshi, Zainab Qureshi

GIFT GIVING: The team delivered Eid gifts to children at the BRI last week, pictured: (back row, l-r) Nurses Emma Walker and Joanna Jacomb; W-Childcare Director, Nazim Ali; W-Childcare Manager, Michaela Yildiz (front row, l-r) Amina Qureshi, Zainab Qureshi

A team of generous gift givers from Bradford have distributed some extra special Eid presents this month as they aimed to ensure all children could join in with the Islamic festivities.

For the third consecutive year, the Girlington-based W-Childcare team handed out almost 30 gifts to poorly children at Bradford Royal Infirmary, just in time for the Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Fitr.

From soft toys to children's DVDs, play sets and sports equipment, an abundance of goods was taken down to Ward 17 last week by the volunteers where they were warmly received by staff.

With the service users at W-Childcare being predominantly Muslim, the club took the decision to spread their holiday celebrations by including children of all faiths and none.

W-Childcare Director, Nazim Ali, who has helped head the project for the past three years, said it was always a proud moment when he handed over the toys.

“With Eid being a special occasion in which families spend quality time together and children receive gifts; the children at W-Childcare have recognised that this is not the case for some children including those who are in hospital,” he said.

“The children were very keen to make their contribution and show they are thinking of their peers who are poorly with a touching message of ‘they are not alone’.

Nazim, who spent time in hospital as a child suffering with tuberculosis, adds that he knows how it feels to be isolated and is always determined to ensure children ‘know they are thought about’.

“This was a gesture of kindness and to show that members of the wider community do care and think about them,” he added.

“The Eid gifts were for all children in the ward irrespective of faith.”

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