Tag Archive: Grammar School

OUTSTANDING! Record top grades for GSAL students in face of tougher exams

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(L-R) Aadarsh Nemana, Niharika Manu, Samyuktha Ganesh, Priyanka Misra and Shazia Sarela celebrate success at GCSE

(L-R) Aadarsh Nemana, Niharika Manu, Samyuktha Ganesh, Priyanka Misra and Shazia Sarela celebrate success at GCSE

 

Students at The Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL) are celebrating their best-ever GCSE results in the top grades with more than a quarter achieving the highest possible grades.

One of the outstanding achievers is Shazia Sarela, who achieved eight A*s and two 9s under the new numerical grading system for English language and literature. She looks set for success in her ambition to attain a place at medical school in two years time after sitting A-levels in maths, further maths, chemistry and biology.

It is the first year that the new 9 – 1 grades have replaced A*-G for English language and English literature, with all other subjects graded in the traditional A*-G format at GSAL. Students at GSAL already study the more rigorous maths IGCSE which remains graded A*-G (although maths GCSE is now graded 9-1).

Other students with the maximum eight A*s include Samyuktha Ganesh, who also earned grades 8 and 9 in English and Priyanka Misra who added 9 and 7 to her clean sweep of A*s.

There were notable performances in this summer’s examinations too from Rohan Karthik with seven A*s, A and two 9s; Manasvi Tyagi with seven A*s, A, 9 and 8; Niharika Manu with seven A*s, A, 9 and 8; Ishak Rouf with seven A*s, B and two 8s; Roshan Singh-Morgan with six A*s, two As, 8 and 9 and Vikram Sharma with six A*s, A, B and two 9s.

 Shazia Sarela achieved a clean sweep of A* and 9 grades

Shazia Sarela achieved a clean sweep of A* and 9 grades

 

From GSAL’s cohort of 220 GCSE candidates, 26 per cent clocked up the highest grades of A/7 or above in every subject, including five who achieved a clean sweep of eight A*s and two grade 9s each.

In the face of national predictions that top grades would be harder to achieve, GSAL students have surpassed the school record for top grades with 42 per cent of grades at A*/8 or above. The school also achieved its best results since 2011 with 98 per cent of passes at C/4 or above.

Nationally 2.2 per cent of GCSE candidates achieved grade 9 in English language while GSAL students achieved 14.5 per cent, almost seven times the national average.

Principal Sue Woodroofe said: “I could not be more proud of this year’s GCSE students. They are the first to have studied the new English language and English literature courses and other GCSE subjects with more challenging course content and they have performed brilliantly.

“These GCSEs are the toughest since the change from O-levels and our results testify to the outstanding achievements of a wonderful group of year 11 students and promise much for their A-level futures.

“I am grateful to staff and parents whose support for, and encouragement of, the children has been first class.”

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Tearing children apart

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Birmingham, Manchester and Lancashire amongst worst locations for segregation in schools

Race, religion, socio-economic background and personal wealth are destroying the potential for children to integrate into society, causing divisions that could last a lifetime.

A troubling new report by the social integration charity, The Challenge, reveals that children in Birmingham, Manchester and Lancashire are amongst the most segregated in the UK.

The researchers deemed a school to be "segregated" if there were a higher number of ethnic minority pupils or pupils on free school meals than at those of neighbouring schools. With primary schools more likely to be segregated based on socio-economic differences, secondary schools are more likely to be segregated by ethnicity.

Taking into account primary faith schools, the report found that these schools were more ethnically segregated than those of no faith. Primary faith schools are also more likely to have a wealthier student population with over a quarter having significantly fewer pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds than those of non-faith schools.

At secondary school level, free Grammar schools - which Theresa May's government wants to expand - were heavily segregated by social background, despite claims that free Grammar schools open opportunities for integration from a broad range of backgrounds.

Almost all of the Grammar schools involved in the research (98 percent) had low pupil numbers of children from poorer backgrounds in comparison to the local high schools whilst none had large numbers of children eligible for free school meals.

Speaking about the study and addressing the findings which show the problem is worsening, with primary schools overall becoming more ethnically segregated in the last five years, Jon Yates, director of The Challenge, said: "At a local and national level, government needs to commit to doing much more to reduce school segregation.

We know that when communities live separately, anxiety and prejudice flourish, whereas when people from different backgrounds mix, it leads to more trusting and cohesive communities and opens up opportunities for social mobility.” He went on.

With over 20,000 schools taking part in the study, carried out over five years, areas that were noticeably segregated and marked as a matter of concern include:

  • Kirklees in West Yorkshire
  • Lancashire as a whole, but especially Blackburn with Darwen
  • Rochdale in Greater Manchester
  • Birmingham
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Courtroom queen

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AWARD WINNER: Sara Nazir received a prestigious award worth £2,500 a year

AWARD WINNER: Sara Nazir received a prestigious award worth £2,500 a year

Sixth Form student secures bursary from top international law firm

A Bradford Girls’ Grammar School student has won a national competition to receive a bursary award from one of the largest international law firms.

Sara Nazir, 17, from Heaton, received the prestigious award, worth a total of £2,500 per year, from CMS Cameron McKenna last week, with the funds helping to meet some of her university living expenses as she studies for a law degree.

As part of the award, the legal teen will also benefit from regular mentoring sessions with one of the firm’s senior lawyers, who will not only provide advice and support throughout the UCAS application process but also in the first stages of her career.

Sara has also been offered paid work experience at their head office in London.

With the law firm ranked in the world’s top 10, Sara was quick to recognise the potential value of the opportunity in furthering her career.

She said:  “I initially entered the competition because of the calibre of the company behind it and the opportunity of work experience and the access to such experienced and qualified mentors.

“In a really competitive market, I know this kind of experience will be extremely beneficial.

“Of course, the financial support towards university living expenses will almost certainly be a huge help.”

Sara was selected for the award after entering a national essay competition which was designed to test an applicant’s knowledge and research of in-depth legal and ethical issues, followed by a rigorous interview and assessment day.

Her submitted essay, which addressed the legality of tax avoidance, was one of over a hundred entrants from sixth form students across the UK, impressing senior partners so much that she was chosen to be one of 12 students invited to the next stage.

Sara said: “I was really excited to be invited to their London office and found the day to be really interesting.

“The interview process itself was quite challenging as they set tasks to test our negotiation skills, so I was very surprised when they called me to say I was only one of four finalists to be awarded a bursary.”

Sara now hopes to study Law at one of the region’s Russell Group Universities and is particularly keen to focus on Corporate Law.

She said: “I am really fascinated by this area of law; how you study an issue from different angles and use critical thinking and analysis to negotiate the optimum resolution.

“I also enjoy studying Commercial Law and Intellectual Property and the research involved around copyrighting and trademarks.”

She added: “I am extremely grateful to CMS for this bursary, not only for the financial help, but all the support that comes with it.”

Senior Associate, Sarah Hyde, who leads the CMS Bursary initiative, commented: “We are proud to see the difference this scheme can make to aspiring lawyers, who may not have the opportunity otherwise, to gain an insight into the legal profession and what it is like to work at a top law firm.”

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Playground gurus: Boys found first sikh society in school’s 500 year history

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SIKH SOCIETY: (L-R) Cousins Marvy Nerwan and Hukam Nerwan

SIKH SOCIETY: (L-R) Cousins Marvy Nerwan and Hukam Nerwan

Cousins from Altrincham have set up the first Sikh Society in the 500-year history of The Manchester Grammar School.

Marvy Nerwan, 16, and his cousin Hukam Nerwan, 15, who are both from Bowden, have founded the first Sikh Society in The Manchester Grammar School’s history since the School was established in 1515.

The pupils are now aiming to set up their own website to give young members of the Sikh community in Manchester, and beyond, a platform to come together.

Hukam said: “When we saw some of the young Year 7 Sikhs who started at the School this year, they looked a little bit lost and it can be daunting starting at such a big school, so we wanted to do something that would unite them.

“We wanted Sikh Soc to be a place where boys at the school could come together, have fun and develop a real sense of community. Since we started, we’ve attracted more than 70 members and it’s great to see people a lot more united, having fun and even meeting up outside school.”

Although it was initially set up to help young Sikhs feel at home, Sikh Soc is open to all boys at the School and the society’s members are now drawn from many different religions and backgrounds.

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: Marvy and Hukam with members of The Manchester Grammar School Sikh Society

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: Marvy and Hukam with members of The Manchester Grammar School Sikh Society

Marvy said: “For us, it is all about bringing together people from different backgrounds and religious persuasions and creating a strong sense of community between them.

“In the future, we hope that we can set up a Sikh Society in the Junior School and when those boys grow up, they can take over from us so we’re looking at this as a long-term project.”

Since the Society was founded, Marvy and Hukam have staged a charity night with dancing and karaoke to raise funds for The Busoga Trust, one of the school’s chosen charities.

The Trust provides sustainable access to safe water, improved sanitation and comprehensive hygiene and health education to the communities in rural Uganda and the Society raised £600 which was match-funded by the Government’s UK Aid Match.

There have also been talks about Indian culture and next week, there will be a debate as to whether Sikhs should be allowed to carry the kirpan – a ceremonial knife – in public.

The debate will be recorded live and uploaded to the cousin’s proposed website, which is expected to go online later this summer.

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GSAL: Students learn from one of Yorkshire’s prime punchers

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SPORTS EDUCATION: Sixth formers at GSAL were delighted to meet one of Leeds' best boxers who visited the school with Sports Relief

SPORTS EDUCATION: Sixth formers at GSAL were delighted to meet one of Leeds'
best boxers who visited the school with Sports Relief

Leeds boxer visits Grammar School At Leeds 

Upper sixth students at The Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL) took ringside seats to hear first-hand about the life of one of the UK’s rising stars in boxing.

Team GB bantamweight boxer, Qais Ashfaq from Leeds, has the Olympics in his sights.

He is seeking to qualify for Rio 2016 after undergoing intensive training at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield.

He has reason to be confident following a successful 2015 in which he won bronze at the European Games in Baku, followed by silver at the European Amateur Championships in Samokov.

Qais had previously won silver at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

As a thank you for GSAL, Sport Relief arranged for Qais to come to school and meet students.

GSAL was one of the charity’s top 500 fundraisers in 2014, and Qais expressed his personal gratitude to the charity - which he believes has helped him to achieve his dream of making boxing his career.

He said: “I took up boxing at the age of eight and Sport Relief has been supporting me since I was a kid.

“I received several little grants from a young age and it would have been hard to keep going without their help.”

During a Q&A session with Qais, students studying physical education at A-level raised topics ranging from the practical - training regime and diet - to the psychological - how do you keep motivated for training and get in the zone before a competition?

Qais said: “The motivation for me is when I have fights coming up - it gives me the extra push. Before a match, I’ve always been the guy to just have a laugh with the others.

“We’re there as a team and I box better when I’m relaxed.”

The students were enthusiastic about their session with Qais.

Hollie Bruce said: “It was great to meet a future Olympian and get an insight into a professional athlete’s life.”

Harvey Walker said: “I found it interesting to learn about the sport institute and how it helps out young athletes in their development.”

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Grammar School at Leeds produces more Asian academic aces

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ACADEMICS: Shahzaib and Manjari are hoping to study at Cambridge University after receiving conditional offers

ACADEMICS: Shahzaib and Manjari are hoping to study at Cambridge University after receiving conditional offers

Cambridge kids

Two bright sparks from the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL), 17-year-old Shahzaib Ahmed and 18-year-old Manjari Dhar, have got their eyes set on the cloisters of Cambridge University after receiving conditional offers from the prestigious academic institution.

The pair are just two of ten students from GSAL hoping to attend one of the Oxbridge establishments when they begin university life later this year.

Shahzaib is hoping for the perfect birthday present, as his 18th birthday falls on the same day as the results.

“It will be an interesting birthday,” he said. “I will be receiving my results in the morning and will only know then whether I have achieved the grades I need.”

The talented teen is looking to forge a career as a brain surgeon or neurosurgeon and has been predicted two A*s and an A. He is quietly confident that he will achieve his goals so that he can study at St John’s.

Shazaib’s letter arrived in the post a day later than most applicants, which made for a ‘hand-trembling’ envelope opening.

He said: “My parents actually opened the letter for me because I wasn’t at home when it arrived in the post.

“They told me it was a heavy envelope so I told them to just open it because I wanted to know what was inside. I was really happy when they said I had been accepted and look forward to reading medicine at Cambridge.”

Meanwhile, Manjari is hoping to go to Cambridge University’s Newnham College to read mathematics.  She found out that she had been accepted by email and needs to attain two A*s and two As for her place.

To make it even more challenging, Manjari is required to complete a series of extra exams, set by the renowned university.

She will have to undertake the STEP (Sixth Term Examination Paper) - a well-established mathematics examination designed to test candidates on questions that are similar in style to undergraduate mathematics.

“My family are very proud of me and it feels amazing to be accepted to such a recognised university,” she said.

“There are some very tough exams coming up but the support at the school has been great and I feel ready for them.”

It has been a long road for the students who have been studying hard since Lower Sixth.

Shazaib said: “It’s been a long process, having to apply early and taking the BMAT (BioMedical Admissions Test) in November, which fell directly before the interviews in December.

“The mock interviews at school were a confidence booster and helped me prepare to demonstrate how good I would be as a doctor and my scientific knowledge. Overall I was surprised and really happy to get the offer.”

Both pupils will become the first members of their families to attend university in the UK when they officially enrol later this year.

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Pupils forced to pray outside

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PRAYER: Students have been forced to pray outside in harsh weather conditions at Mirfield Free Grammar School and Sixth Form

PRAYER: Students have been forced to pray outside in harsh weather conditions at Mirfield Free Grammar School and Sixth Form

Legal action considered by ‘disappointed’ parents

Parents of students at a grammar school in Kirklees have voiced their disapproval of the way their children have been treated after they were forced to conduct their prayers outside.

They say this has been going on for more than a year at Mirfield Free Grammar School and Sixth Form as the schools has said they don’t have any facilities to pray inside.

Now, their families have acquired a legal representative to regain the “dignity” they say their children deserve.

Yunus Lunat, a solicitor at the Leeds-based law firm, Ison Harrison, is acting on behalf of the families.

“The problem has been going on for about a-year-and-a-half now but they have only recently instructed me formally to take it up on their behalf,” he said.

“All that these children want is a bit of respect and a bit of dignity to be able to say their prayers and practice their faith.

“It is very important that the message is put out there that they do not want a specific prayer room, they just want a space that can be utilised by all the students and people of all and no faiths.”

Mr Lunat explained how the complaint had been put forward by parents of the sixth form students as he says children in the lower school are not allowed to conduct prayers.

A statement from head of the academy, Lorraine Barker, described the school as “broadly Christian” and said they have never had a prayer room.

She continued: “Before students join the sixth form we make them aware of the facilities we have on site and we are clear that we have no prayer room.

FAITH: Children conduct prayers in the playground after being told there are no facilities inside

FAITH: Children conduct prayers in the playground after being told there are no facilities inside

“Sixth form students are welcome to go off site in order to pray and we have made arrangements in the local community for this to happen.”

However, Mr Lunat responded to the head’s message with further calls for clarification.

ACTION: Yunus Lunat is the solicitor representing the student’s parents

ACTION: Yunus Lunat is the solicitor representing the student’s parents

“Is she suggesting that if parents want their children to attend her school, and they want to pray during the day time, then instead of going to her school, they should instead go to an all faith school? Is that what they want in society?

“These children are being integrated into mainstream society and as a leader, she should be managing that,” Mr Lunat said.

He adds that “the ball is now in the school’s court” as to what the next course of action will be.

Mirfield Free Grammar School was previously the subject of much media coverage after a student fled to join Islamic State.

Talha Aslam became the youngest British suicide bomber after driving a truck full of explosives into an oil refinery in Iraq.

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H-APP-y times for Leeds students

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CLEVER: The Best App winning team included: Emily Ball, Hannah Wakefield, Ciara Gara, Tanaya Maslekar, Mia Bradley, Mahika Gogi, Bushra Tellisi, Beth Irwin-Jones

CLEVER: The Best App winning team included: Emily Ball, Hannah Wakefield, Ciara Gara, Tanaya Maslekar, Mia Bradley, Mahika Gogi, Bushra Tellisi, Beth Irwin-Jones

City’s tech-whizzes triumph in countywide competition

A team of business-savvy students from Leeds proved they were the real deal when it comes to innovation last week as they won the best app award at the Yorkshire Coca-Cola Enterprises Real Business Challenge.

The eight girls, all in Y10 at the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL) had previously qualified for the Yorkshire finals, held at the York Barbican, on the strength of a presentation they had prepared in school.

On the day, with a place in the nationals at stake, nine school teams were tasked with promoting the Special Olympics, which provides sports training and competitions programmes for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.

After completing a number of tasks, each team gave a presentation, on the strength of which the judges decided which team to put through to the national final.

Included in the tasks was the design of an app to promote the Special Olympics and a fundraising sports day.

It was here that the GSAL team excelled in the contest and scooped the award for Best App.

Team member Mahika Gogi said: “We were under a lot of time pressure on the day, with about six tasks to complete in three hours. Despite not making it through to the final we were delighted to win the best app award for our Flappy Bird inspired app incorporating a pedometer to promote fitness.”

Luke Clogher, teacher of business studies and economics, added: “The team were outstanding on the day, energetic, positive and working really well as a team. Their award was well deserved – they put some creative ideas into a very well-designed app. They also gave an exceptionally good presentation for their age group.

“The competition is based on marketing and promotion and stretches the students well beyond GCSE level and what they learn in class. It also shows students that what they learn about business can be used to promote social aims and help others.”

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Bracelets for Blankets

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BUSINESS: Jana Braun-Wilson, Amn Bashir, Maleehah Aziz and Muskaan Amini sold the bracelets at school to help impoverished people in India

BUSINESS: Jana Braun-Wilson, Amn Bashir, Maleehah Aziz and Muskaan Amini sold the bracelets at school to help impoverished people in India

Warm message from Bradford to India

Determined fundraisers from a school in Bradford have helped purchase more than 500 blankets for some of the world’s poorest families after selling traditional bracelets to their fellow pupils.

The ‘Bracelets for Blankets’ team, consisting of Bradford Girls’ Grammar School’s Jana Braun-Wilson, Amn Bashir, Maleehah Aziz and Muskaan Amini, came together to spearhead the project and sell Himalayan crystal bracelets during their break times.

Not only did the quartet market the bracelets, but they also designed and manufactured the products themselves.

AID: Photos of people in Gujarat, India, who benefitted form the project were sent to the girls at Bradford Girls’ Grammar School

AID: Photos of people in Gujarat, India, who benefitted form the project were sent to the girls at Bradford Girls’ Grammar School

With the girl’s business savvy attitude, and determination to raise funds for the charity, they were able to sell out of products, setting a new trend amongst their fellow students.

In total, more than £340 was raised for the Saisruti Charitable Trust, with the organisation using the funds to purchase the blankets before shipping them to those most in need.

blankets bought from bracelets (266x300)Tanu Bashir the UK representative for the Trust, thanked the girls for their efforts and sent a number of photos from the individuals who have benefited from the blankets, over in India.

He added: “These blankets were greatly appreciated by those who were in great need of the aid.”

The Saisruti Charitable Trust is a registered charity which is actively involved in voluntary services mostly in India.

Through fundraising work around the world, they help people in the most deprived areas of the South Asian country with healthcare and the provision of clothes.

Following the project, Bradford’s own ‘Bracelets for Blankets’ team said they were determined to hold similar events in the future.

“We decided to raise money for this charity, and help some of the poorest people in India, by selling our own range of Himalayan crystal bracelets to family and friends” they said.

 

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Oxbridge awaits

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OFFERS: Fourteen current sixth form students at GSAL are holding offers from Oxbridge colleges, (back l-r): Daniel Drazen, Daniel Voice, Adam Bush, Tom Whittaker, Josephine Pepper, (middle l-r): Amol Joshi, Jeremy Huitson, Ashwin Venkatesh, Marcus Roberts, Katherine Pye (front l-r): Amy Smith, Michael McLeish, Jemma Silvert, Megan Gilbert

OFFERS: Fourteen current sixth form students at GSAL are holding offers from Oxbridge colleges, (back l-r): Daniel Drazen, Daniel Voice, Adam Bush, Tom Whittaker, Josephine Pepper, (middle l-r): Amol Joshi, Jeremy Huitson, Ashwin Venkatesh, Marcus Roberts, Katherine Pye (front l-r): Amy Smith, Michael McLeish, Jemma Silvert, Megan Gilbert

17 offers for grammar school’s intellectual elite

The chance to study at one of England’s most prestigious universities is not a common occurrence yet for 17 academics at a single Leeds sixth form, a life at Oxbridge could be just around the corner.

Students from the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL) are continuing the impressive success rate of their predecessors in securing offers from Oxford and Cambridge universities.

Fourteen current Year 13 students now hold conditional offers from the two renowned establishments, whilst three alumni, who graduated last year, have also received offers.

Amongst the nine students holding a conditional offer from Cambridge are two 18-year-olds, Ashwin Venkatesh and Amol Joshi, who both hope to study medicine.

The intellectual pair both currently take the same lessons at GSAL and have similar aspirations for their future academic life.

Ashwin, from Alwoodley, noted the moment he opened the letter confirming his conditional offer last month and how determined he was now to achieve the grades ‘expected’ of him.

“My first and second interviews at Cambridge were held on 10th December and I felt they went as well as they could have but there is always a bit of uncertainty about whether you have done enough,” he said.

“When I received my letter it didn’t really sink in at first and it still hasn’t now. To have the chance to study at Cambridge is a major opportunity and I am very thankful for that.

“I phoned my mum after reading the letter and she broke down crying on the phone. It is a big achievement but I think all of us are now even more determined to achieve the grades expected of us and attend Cambridge next year.”

SMART: Ashwin Venkatesh (left) and Amol Joshi both received conditional offers from Cambridge University last month and hope to study medicine

SMART: Ashwin Venkatesh (left) and Amol Joshi both received conditional offers from Cambridge University last month and hope to study medicine

Amol, from Moortown, added that he was less confident following his interview but remained calm under pressure to impress the interviewees.

“I was a bit nervous after the interview because I knew I had made some mistakes but the important thing was that I was able to guide myself to a valid conclusion,” he said.

“My letter arrived on 10th January like Ashwin and he actually phoned me in the morning to say ‘I’m in, how have you done’, before I had even looked.

“I sent him a message later that day saying ‘you’re stuck with me for another six years’ which felt really good.”

Last year, 17 students from GSAL received offers from Oxbridge colleges, with this year’s tally equalling the record for the school.

Teacher Ray Peacock is GSAL’s Oxbridge coordinator. He said he was ‘delighted’ to once again see a number of GSAL students receive offers from Oxbridge.

Explaining more about the application process, he said: “It’s a demanding application process that has become increasingly competitive in recent years.

“We offer a comprehensive programme of support in school, to help students demonstrate their passion for their chosen subjects on their UCAS personal statement, hone their independent thinking skills in preparation for the interview and prepare for specific admissions tests.

“While the candidates engaged fully with our programme it is ultimately their own commitment and hard work that secured these sought after offers, and we are hugely proud of their success.”

 

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Kickboxing Queens

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Sporting Siblings clean up at local tournament

CHAMPIONS: Kisa and Nida Hamdani train with the Fusion Martial Arts Club in Bradford

CHAMPIONS: Kisa and Nida Hamdani train with the Fusion Martial Arts Club in Bradford

The ‘fighting spirit’ of two sisters from Bradford shone through earlier this month as they both picked up medals at an annual kickboxing competition.

Kisa and Nida Hamdani, who both attend Bradford Girls Grammar School, were successful in their categories during the highly anticipated ‘Fightnight’ competition.

Organised by the Fusion Martials Arts club and staged at their centre in the city, Year 8 pupil, Kisa, clinched awards in both continuous fighting and points sparring heats.

Finishing second overall in her age category, the young sporting enthusiast was awarded a silver medal to round off a memorable performance.

Younger sister, Nidah, also found success in her points sparring heat, finishing in first place for her age category and taking home the much decorated trophy.

The Year 4 pupil is following in her sister’s footsteps in the sport and showed that kickboxing certainly runs in the family with her convincing display.

Both girls have been attending twice-weekly classes at The Kickboxing Fusion Centre for the past two years and have now progressed to their purple and white belt grading respectively.

With further trophies and belts up for grabs this year, the sporting siblings will be looking to add to their recent trophy haul over the next 12 months.

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