Tag Archive: asians

Sights set on the big screen: Council funded association celebrates International Day of Older People

Leave a Comment
FILM NIGHT: Debbani Ghosh wanted ‘to do something different’ for the Bengali community of Leeds, so has decided to host a film night

FILM NIGHT: Debbani Ghosh wanted ‘to do something different’ for the Bengali community of Leeds, so has decided to host a film night

On Saturday 22nd October, the Association of Blind Asians – funded by Leeds City Council - will celebrate the International Day of Older People.

And what better way to do it than a film night, complete with popcorn, at a local community centre.

Manager of the Association of Blind Asians, Debbani Ghosh, said: “We wanted to do something different.

“I decided to do a movie night for people in the community as it is something different for residents. We’re doing a Bengali movie night to bring isolated people who are in their later lives together.”

So far, Debbani has had very positive feedback and she has already booked out the Frederick Hurdle Day Centre on Reginald Terrace for the occasion.

“The council have been very supportive. We’ve ordered some food and it’s the first time this has happened.”

She added: “It’s not going to be a huge screen and the funding is only for 25 people. However, if we see that people are interested in it, we’ll continue it in the long term.”

The reason for the get together is to talk about mental health and culture whilst enjoying a classic film at the same time to open up dialogue between attendees.

“Movies impact mental health in a positive  way because they teach you how to get over hurdles,” Debbani said.

“The film we have picked is called ‘Belaseshe’ which means ‘at the end of the day’ in Bengali.”

Debbani explained that there’s a realisation in the film that people support each other and everyone has different skills and strengths.

“Unfortunately, we only have room for 25 people.” Debbani said.

“I’m from the Bengali community and I thought that there’s nothing happening for this particular community.

“Everyone in attendance on the day will have some form of sight issue. We are inviting our members down and outsiders so everyone can feel connected into the community.”

To find out more, ring the ABA office on 0113 210 3347.

Share this:
Share

Getting Asians into football

Leave a Comment
ON FIELD AND OFF FIELD PROBLEMS: The challenge of getting more Asian footballers into the top tiers of the English game remains a priority

ON FIELD AND OFF FIELD PROBLEMS: The challenge of getting more Asian footballers into the top tiers of the English game remains a priority

Representation number ‘must increase’

As Premier League clubs continue to spend millions of pounds on players from around the world, one demographic is still missing in the country’s favourite sport – Asians.

Currently, the only player of British Asian descent playing in the Premier League is Swansea City’s Neil Taylor, while Adil and Samir Nabi at West Bromwich Albion, Aston Villa's Easah Suliman and Liverpool’s Yan Dhanda are among a host of prospects hoping to make it into the top tier.

With such little representation across the top tiers of the game, Asians are struggling to make their mark on the pitch.

Sporting Equals, the UK's leading charity promoting ethnic diversity in sport and physical activity, have been working to create a more reflective game.

This week, they have announced the continuation of their strategic partnership with the UK Asian Football Championships – now in its 18th year – as they help to raise the profile of Asians in football.

The event is organised by the Scottish Ethnic Minority Sports Association SEMSA and in partnership with Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Life, Rangers Football Club and Celtic Football Club.

STAR PLAYER: Neil Taylor is currently the only player of British Asian descent playing in the Premier League

STAR PLAYER: Neil Taylor is currently the only player of British Asian descent playing in the Premier League

Arun Kang CEO Sporting Equals commenting on the partnership said: “We are delighted to be able to support the Asian Football Championships in its eighteenth year of being.

“Even though this is a momentous achievement in itself it is still sad to think that after 18 years, there still remains a lack of Asian footballers at elite level here in the UK.

“We feel that greater thinking needs to be carried out by influencing bodies to promote Asian football talent.

“However, in this instance, we congratulate the fantastic commitment and support of the Asian Football Championships who have kept alive this issue to empower Asian footballers, coaches and volunteers."

Kash Siddiqi is one of only nine Asian footballers to have played in the Football League and is a big supporter of Sporting Equals.

Commenting on the existing problems in the game, he said: “It is great to see initiatives such as the Asian Football Championships taking place. The event provides a great platform for Asian football talent.”

Paul Elliott, former Celtic FC player and the first black professional footballer to sit on the FA Council, is supporting the championships.

With preliminary games set to be played at Glasgow Green Football Centre before the final is staged at Celtic Park, he has more connection than most to the tournament this year.

“Whilst it is great to see significant numbers of professional footballers from the African Caribbean communities it is concerning that, in comparison, south Asian communities have yet to break through in any significant number,” he said.

“More thought and understanding is needed of the challenges that have prevented Asian players to enter the elite game in the UK.

“This tournament helps to keep shining the light on this important issue and I congratulate Sporting Equals and SEMSA in supporting and organising it.”

Share this:
Share

Scouting all Asians!

Leave a Comment
PILLARS OF THE COMMUNITY: Haroon Adam (right) and Usman Umar (left) give up all their free time to helping the people of Dewsbury thrive and reach their best potential

PILLARS OF THE COMMUNITY: Haroon Adam (right) and Usman Umar (left) give up all their free time to helping the people of Dewsbury thrive and reach their best potential

Historic association is searching for the next generation of scouts and leaders

For decades it has been the stepping stone for kids to achieve personal growth - the epitome of Englishness - as British a tradition as a cup of tea and a slice of cake.

And now, as Prime Minister David Cameron pushes British Values on an ever-diverse Britain, it is young Asians who are being called upon to earn their badges and ‘tie a knot’ with the Scouts.

In Dewsbury, one leg of the Muslim Scouts have been working hard to give over 50 children the advantage sin life which support interests and needs of young people.

An umbrella organisation within the UK Scout Association, the group has representatives and members all over the country.

Haroon Adam is one of the organisers and also founder of the Muslim-led initiate ‘Engage’ in Kirklees.

The group aims to bring people of all faiths together to stand against Daesh and prevent radicalisation, messages he promotes through his work with the scouts.

However, despite demand rising for membership with the Muslim Scouts, it is a lack of volunteers that is hampering any further progression.

Only girls are currently enrolled in the Dewsbury group with a waiting list of up to 40 boys.

Haroon is therefore appealing for more volunteers to get onboard to help the community’s young people, holding an open day for volunteers and parents on 10th April.

He said: “We have 30 to 40 boys wanting to join the scouts but we can’t cater to their needs because we don’t have enough volunteers. Hopefully our presentation will get peoples’ interest sparked.

“Our young people will tell volunteers about what they can expect from joining Scouts, and also ask parents if they want to be leaders.

“We already have a good group here yet we need more to help break down the stereotype that Scouts is only for non-Muslim children.”

He added: “I’m hoping all parents will get involved, mothers and fathers, as it gets them out of the house and this whole thing can become a family activity.”

Usman Umar, a fellow organiser with the Muslim Scouts, is a prime example of how volunteering can be done around you professional and personal life.

He has been a youth worker for 29 years, whilst also acting as a rotating chair of Dewsbury Engage, the secretary and treasurer for Dad’s Group, and chair for his local Neighbourhood Watch.

Despite so many commitments he said the Scouts are an important part of his life, beneficial to both children and adults.

He added: “It may seem like we’re doing it just for the kids but there are other factors to consider like trying to get parents out of the house and involved with their kids and the community.

“Parents get new skills, there’s a sense of belonging and British Values are promoted.”

The Muslim Scouts are open to young people, aged between six and 16, with sessions held every Sunday at Kick Off, Dewsbury, by volunteers.

Activities range from axe-throwing to bouldering; kayaking to archery and raft building to rope skills, plus much, much more.

A taster session for current members will run on 10th April from 12pm until 3pm, calling for new volunteers and parents to come on down, before an open day for prospective new members will be held in July.

Share this:
Share

‘It’s a growing problem’

Leave a Comment

If you have one, or a number of the conditions below, you are at a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes:

• Being from a South Asian background
• Have a body mass index (BMI) of over 30
• Have a close relative with condition
• Are over 40-years-old
• Have high cholesterol or blood pressure
• Your waist is over 37 inches (for men),  or 31.5 inches (for women)

Concerned pharmacist approaches Asian Express to discuss concerns surrounding diabetes and the South Asian community

With more than 2.5million people already diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in the UK, a Bradford pharmacist has been speaking out about the need to find the other ‘missing million’.

AWARENESS: Moahmmed Sharaz, who runs a pharmacist in East Bowling, Bradford, wants to see more people come forward and take advantage of free diabetes tests

AWARENESS: Moahmmed Sharaz, who runs a pharmacist in East Bowling, Bradford, wants to see more people come forward and take advantage of free diabetes tests

Mohammed Sharaz, who runs Lloyds Pharmacy on Coventry Street, East Bowling, is just one professional who has seen a rise in the number of people being diagnosed with the condition, especially from South Asian backgrounds.

People from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and neighbouring countries are statistically six times more likely to suffer from the condition than their European counterparts and Mr Sharaz believes it is a statistic which cannot be ignored.

“With so many people already diagnosed with the condition, the word is definitely beginning to spread, yet there are still so many undiagnosed cases out there,” he explained.

“People are beginning to come forward more often but there is still that fear factor of ‘what if I’m diagnosed?’ and then people instantly assume they will need to start self-injecting.

“This isn’t the case and we need to get rid of that idea. If you are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, firstly we can try and control it through a diet, then if that doesn’t work, through tablets, and only as a last resort do we recommend injecting insulin.”

Type 2 diabetes is a long term health condition characterised by high levels of glucose in the blood, meaning there is too much sugar in the bloodstream and the body can’t get rid of it. Common symptoms include tiredness, increased frequency to urinate, blurred vision and dried eyes.

If undiagnosed, sufferers can develop serious problems, from heart and kidney disease to blindness.

A diet with high amounts of sugar, fatty food and carbohydrates, significantly increases the chances of somebody having the disease, whilst other likely risk factors include, having a high blood pressure and cholesterol, being over 40-years-old and having relatives with the condition.

As the condition continues to affect more people across the UK, Lloyds Pharmacy’s, such as the one Mr Sharaz runs, have begun to offer free Type 2 diabetes checks for everybody.

“By doing the tests for free, we hope to make more people aware about the condition,” Mr Sharaz said.

“We take a small blood test from your finger and check all the symptoms – it only takes between two and five minutes and you will get an immediate answer.

“Some people come in and go away really happy because they don’t have the condition despite having most of the symptoms whilst others are glad to be diagnosed early so there is a better chance to fight it.

“We are trying to find the missing million and hopefully by raising the awareness, we can do just that.”

Share this:
Share