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Acute care gets an overhaul

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CUTTING EDGE: The new Ambulatory Care Unit cost £750,000 and is a ‘revolutionary improvement’

CUTTING EDGE: The new Ambulatory Care Unit cost £750,000 and is a ‘revolutionary improvement’

BRI receives boost of over £1 million in hospital equipment

Staff from Bradford Teaching Hospitals will celebrate Acute Medicine Awareness Day (AMAD) on Tuesday by highlighting the innovative changes that have taken place over the past year.

The creation of a new £750,000 Ambulatory Care Unit and a second £600,000 Acute Medical Unit (AMU) has meant that Bradford Royal Infirmary is now amongst the most cutting edge hospitals in the country.

Acute Medicine Consultant, Dr Jonathan Walker, said “AMAD aims to raise awareness of the work that goes on in our department and how it relates to the rest of the hospital.

“A new emergency and urgent care patient pathway was put into place last year with a complete service overhaul and revolutionary improvements to ensure people receive the right treatment as quickly as possible.

“The creation of our ambulatory care unit and our AMUs has seen big changes in the last 12 months in the way we work, and our patients are now seeing the benefits, for example those patients in our ambulatory care unit can now return home each evening with the option of returning the next day for further investigations if necessary. The average patient spends - at the most - around 72 hours on the unit.”

He continued: “Acute care sits right at the heart of our hospital and how it functions and cares for its patients. Through AMAD, we are aiming to raise awareness of what we do as well as encourage the right professionals into our speciality as it is an incredibly important and rewarding job.”

DOCTOR ON CALL: Acute Medicine Consultant at the BRI, Johnny Walker, said the new equipment will mean that patients will only have to be in the hospital for around 72 hours at most

DOCTOR ON CALL: Acute Medicine Consultant at the BRI, Johnny Walker, said the new equipment will mean that patients will only have to be in the hospital for around 72 hours at most

The co-located ambulatory care and acute medical units on Wards 1 and 4 have ensured that the Foundation Trust’s provision for acutely unwell patients is one of the largest in the country, both in size and patient numbers.

Together, the units act as the first port of call for many people following their admission from the hospital’s Emergency Department or via urgent GP referral, and it is here that the acute medical team diagnoses and manages complex medical and social issues, as well as providing on-going care.

Tomorrow, staff will host an all-day stand in the Bradford Royal infirmary’s main reception, where patients and visitors will get the opportunity to find out more about the work of the many different professions who contribute to the patient’s journey across the department.

Specialist Registrar in Acute Medicine and AMAD organiser, Adrian Kennedy, added: “Acute Medicine helps put the spotlight on the multi-disciplinary teamwork which goes on in the department as doctors, nurses, health care assistants, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, pharmacists, porters, medical students, social workers and psychiatric liaison workers all play a vital role in the care and treatment of our patients.

“These fantastic partnerships aim to ensure people visiting the Bradford Royal Infirmary receive the best possible patient experience despite their circumstances, while allowing us to run an effective and efficient acute medical service.”

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Bradford Dr gets highest award of Mauritius

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A doctor from Bradford Royal Infirmary has been praised for his work in helping to improve medical care in his home country of Mauritius as he received the nation’s highest civilian honour

PROUD: Dr Sulleman Moreea was presented with the Grand Officer of the Star and Key of the Indian Ocean award last month for his work in Mauritius

PROUD: Dr Sulleman Moreea was presented with the Grand Officer of the Star and Key of the Indian Ocean award last month for his work in Mauritius

Dr Sulleman Moreea was presented with the Grand Officer of the Star and Key of the Indian Ocean Medal by the President of Mauritius, Mr Kailash Purryag, at a formal ceremony on Thursday 19th June.

The award is the equivalent of a British knighthood and commends the work Dr  Moreea has undertaken since 2008 – helping to introduce, train and improve endoscopies across the country’s five hospitals.

Working closely with Mauritius’ Ministry of Health and Prime Minister, Dr Navinchandra Ramgoolam, the Bradford practitioner has done much of the work at his own expense, and time, including travel, equipment, and training.

Speaking upon his return to the UK, Dr Moreea thanked his friends, family and colleagues for helping him achieve the award, adding that there was still more work to be done.

“I felt exceedingly proud when I received the medal from the President of Mauritius and was just bursting with emotion,” he said.

“I think this medal signals the start of a new episode, and every morning now I wake up thinking ‘how am I going to justify this medal’ but in fact I have a plan. “We are in the middle of it right now and have achieved a lot but there is still a lot more to come and as things progress in the UK, I need to transfer this know-how to Mauritius.”

Following the formal presentation, Dr Moreea and his family held their own celebratory event, but not before an invite to a tea party at the State House where the president and prime minister spoke to all nominees and their relatives.

This was described by Dr Moreea as an ‘extremely memorable occasion’ and one he will never forget.

“After we had finished with all the formalities we then had a huge garden party for family, friends and colleagues. Even the vice-prime minister of country came and we had a great time.”

Since starting work in Mauritius, the country’s five hospitals have seen their operating standards improve significantly with endoscopies now able to be performed in units which previously didn’t even exist. In one hospital, in the south of the country, Dr Moreea not only paid for an architect to design a room which could cater for endoscopy facilities but also paid for the equipment.

Since operations began in 2012, more than 600 have been performed.

 

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Highest honour for BRI doctor

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A doctor from Bradford Royal Infirmary said he was ‘incredibly humbled’ after learning of the news that he was to be honoured with his home country’s highest civilian honour.

Dr Sulleman Moreea, originally from Mauritius, was awarded the Grand Officer of the Star and Key of the Indian Ocean award earlier this month from the President of the African nation.

AWARDED: Dr Sulleman Moreea was given the highest civilian honour available in Mauritius for his tireless efforts in improving the country’s hospitals

AWARDED: Dr Sulleman Moreea was given the highest civilian honour available in Mauritius for his tireless efforts in improving the country’s hospitals

Since 2008 he has worked closely with Mauritius’ Prime Minister, Navin Ramgoolam, and the country’s Ministry of Health, to introduce, train and improve endoscopies across the five hospitals.

Having done much of the work at his own expense, including travel, equipment, and training, and all in his own time, Dr Moreea was told he was to receive a medal for his efforts yet never expected to receive such a prestigious accolade.

“It was on Sunday 9th March that I got a phone call from the Mauritius Prime Minister telling me the country was going to give me a medal for the work I had done and it would be announced on Wednesday 12th,” he said.

“I was obviously full of pride but I told him that I may not be able to make it at such short notice as I hadn’t booked any time off.

“It was actually my family and co-workers who insisted I went. My colleagues were amazing, they took care of all my work that week because they said it was a ‘once in a lifetime opportunity I couldn’t miss’.”

He added: “When the list was announced and I saw which medal I was to receive I was incredibly humbled, shocked and surprised.

“I would have felt extremely privileged to receive any medal but this one has certainly acted as motivation for me to finish what I started in the country.”

Dr Moreea first began working in Mauritius six years ago after organising one-to-one training following a discussion with the country’s Prime Minister, who is also a former doctor at the Yorkshire Clinic.

His work across the five hospitals has helped improve the operating standards significantly whilst endoscopies can now be performed in units which previously didn’t even exist.

In one hospital, in the south of the country, Dr Moreea not only paid for an architect to design a room which could cater for endoscopy facilities but also paid for the equipment.

Running since 2012, and officially opened in 2013, it has so far performed more than 600 cases.

Yet, Dr Moreea insists that single achievements like this are not what he is most proud of.

“Unfortunately, with Mauritius being a small country and having a lot of private health care, people previously did not like to share their knowledge and talents with others,” he explained.

“If you said to me, ‘what am I most proud of, teaching people how to do endoscopy or changing the mind-set of the people’, I’d say I’m much more proud of the latter.

“Hospitals work best when people help each other and I like to believe that I have helped change the culture in Mauritius which will only benefit the next generation of doctors.

“At the end of the day, I do this because I enjoy it. I enjoy teaching, I enjoy seeing people making progress and I enjoy seeing the country making an effort to help its people.”

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Boost for Bradford Royal Infirmary

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Midwives and doctors at Bradford Royal Infirmary will have their jobs enhanced following investment worth £346,000 in new technology.

The money will be used to buy hi-tech devices, among them tablets and computer software, to support doctors and midwives within the maternity department which handles 6,000 births a year.

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Head of Midwifery, Julie Walker, said: “This investment is fantastic news as it will help us to transform the way we care for our patients both in the community and when they come to our hospital.

“The money will be spent on our ‘paperless midwife’ project which is enabling community staff to access and record women’s medical histories on handheld devices in a move away from handwritten notes.

“It will also mean that, at the touch of a button, women will have secure access to view their own medical notes wherever they are in the country – so it is a win-win situation which will improve the patient experience and has real benefits for everyone.”

Starting last month, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was one of the first hospitals in the country to introduce a paperless maternity service. It means thousands of  paper notes will be replaced with online records that can be viewed securely over the internet.

The Foundation Trust’s money, which has been secured from the NHS England’s Nursing Technology Fund, will go towards the purchase of 70 hand-held tablets for community midwives, 21 computers on wheels which allow ward-based midwives and doctors to record care electronically at the woman’s bedside, and six electronic screens which will display live data allowing doctors to access patient details in a secure area within each ward.

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Director of Informatics, Cindy Fedell said: “Healthcare is changing rapidly and this kind of new, modern technology is part of the innovative and new ways of working that we are embracing in our drive to put patients first.

“Seventy per cent of pregnant women that we surveyed wanted to have direct, online access to their medical records and this project will deliver this service.

“For our staff who work on the go and now have instant, electronic access to a patient’s   medical history, it will ensure that they won’t need to make as many trips back to the office to collect and drop off paperwork.

“It will also help clinical staff on our wards deliver a quicker, more efficient service, while at the same time freeing everyone up to spend more time with the women, babies and families within their care.”

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‘Wake-up call’ for Bradford hospital

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A liver machine, unveiled last week at Bradford Royal Infirmary, has been described as a ‘wake-up call’, allowing patients at Bradford Teaching Hospitals the ability to avoid invasive and potentially painful liver biopsies.

The new £85,000 Fibroscan liver machine will use the latest technology to examine patients’ organs without the need to undergo surgery of any sort.

The machine works by placing a probe on the patient’s skin which provides immediate, non-invasive information on the state and condition of the liver.

EXAMINATION: Dr Sulleman Moreea with specialist nurse Karl Ward and patient Joyce Varley who suffers from an auto-immune disease which attacks the body's bile ducts

EXAMINATION: Dr Sulleman Moreea with specialist nurse
Karl Ward and patient Joyce Varley who suffers from an
auto-immune disease which attacks the body's bile ducts

By using this method, patients can get a quicker diagnosis and avoid having to undergo an invasive liver biopsy, which has been the standard way of assessing liver tissue up to now.

Consultant hepatologist, Dr Sulleman Moreea, a committee member of the liver section of the British Society of Gastroenterologists, estimates that 20 per cent of Bradford patients should no longer need a biopsy.

He welcomed the equipment for its quick and pain free technology and hopes that the machines will allow for the elimination of liver biopsies altogether within five to ten years.

He said: “Fibroscan represents the latest in cutting edge technology and is good news for our liver patients and for those people who we suspect might have liver disease.

“Up to now we have used liver biopsies to determine the nature and extent of liver disease.

“A biopsy is time consuming as patients have to spend the day in hospital having blood tests, and it needs to be carried out by an expert radiologist after the skin is injected with local anesthetic, carrying a risk of discomfort and a smaller risk of internal bleeding.

“However, the Fibroscan is a completely painless and non-invasive procedure which can be completed in 15 minutes in our outpatient department.”

There are currently three Fibroscan machines in operation in West Yorkshire in total yet Bradford has become the first in the region to use it to measure fat content in the liver.

“Diagnosing liver disease and damage as early as possible is paramount in giving patients the best chances of recovery,” added Dr Moreea. “Patients can instantly see pictures of the liver and the figures generated by the machine. This can be the incentive they need to change their lifestyles to improve their liver health.

“While all other causes of death are falling, the number of people dying from liver disease is rising.”

Liver disease is the fifth biggest cause of death in England and Wales after heart disease, cancer, stroke and respiratory disease.

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