Tag Archive: hate crimes

British Sikh Report gives new insight

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INSPIRATIONAL: Jasvir Singh OBE is Chair of British Sikh Report and hopes the census assists in addressing intra-community

INSPIRATIONAL: Jasvir Singh OBE is Chair of British Sikh Report and hopes the census assists in addressing intra-community

 

13% of Sikhs have been victims of hate crimes since the Referendum, but 69% would support their child joining the Armed Forces

The latest annual British Sikh Report (BSR), which provides robust strategic evidence about British Sikhs looks into several key areas affecting them.

Based on the results of a survey of over 2,000 Sikhs throughout the country, it aims to provide quantitative data reflecting the views, aims and aspirations of the British Sikh community.

Some of the key findings in the report relate to last year’s EU Referendum. 65% of Sikhs voted to remain in the EU, but 73% would now vote to remain if there was a second EU Referendum, suggesting that 8% regret how they voted or how they didn’t vote in June 2016. 13% said that they have been victims of hate crimes since the Referendum.

However, there is still a strong sense of duty and national pride amongst British Sikhs, with 69% of them saying they would support their son or daughter joining the Armed Forces.

It is anticipated that the report will assist governmental bodies and non-Sikh organisations in working with the current British Sikh population on collaborative projects, as well as providing statistics that will assist gurdwaras and Sikh institutions in addressing intra-community issues.

IN PARLIAMENT: (Left-Right) Hartej Singh – researcher for British Sikh Report, Jagdev Singh Virdee – Editor of British Sikh Report and Jasvir Singh OBE – Chair of British Sikh Report

IN PARLIAMENT: (Left-Right) Hartej Singh – researcher for British Sikh Report, Jagdev Singh Virdee – Editor of British Sikh Report and Jasvir Singh OBE – Chair of British Sikh Report

 

Jasvir Singh OBE, chair of the British Sikh Report, comments: “This document reflects the diversity that exists within the British Sikh community, and provides a snapshot of what it means to be Sikh in modern Britain.

“At a time when there is increasing intolerance in society, I hope that documents such as the British Sikh Report help people celebrate their differences as well as their commonalities.”

Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Minister for Faith and Integration, said: "This survey is more than just a Sikh census. Its launch in our Parliament is fitting, as this is a tool, I am sure, which will inspire Sikhs of all generations to become more and more involved in the political process, from engagement with political leaders, to running for office.”

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Ban on religious wear is “not discriminatory”

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ANGRY: Bana Gora (CEO, Muslim Women’s Council) delivering a speech on Muslim Women’s Rights

ANGRY: Bana Gora (CEO, Muslim Women’s Council) delivering a speech on Muslim Women’s Rights

 

Outrage after European Court of Justice (ECJ) says Employers are entitled to ban workers from the "visible wearing of any political, philosophical or religious sign”

In a devastating blow to human rights and the right to religious freedom, this week’s  ruling from the ECJ, which says employers have the right to ban any visible religious attire and signs, has caused outrage.

The case was prompted after Samira Achbita, a receptionist for global company G4S in Belgium was fired from her job, after three years with the company, when she began to wear a headscarf to work.

She claimed she was being discriminated against because of her religion But when the Belgian's court of cassation referred the case to the EU's top court for clarification, they cleared G4S of any discriminatory charges.

G4S claimed in their workplace regulations  they forbid employees "from wearing any visible signs of their political, philosophical or religious beliefs and/or from engaging in any observance of such beliefs.”

This is the court's first decision on the issue of Islamic headscarves at work and whilst they have instigated the ruling, it must be based on internal company policy requiring all employees to "dress neutrally.”

Covering up: Muslim women wear the hijab for modesty as part of their faith

Covering up: Muslim women wear the hijab for modesty as part of their faith

 

Now human rights groups say that the suggestion that the hijab is not part of a “neutral” dress code merely implies that it is a provocation, and it only serves to undercut the religious freedoms of Muslim women, a group who are already bearing the brunt of rising Islamophobia in Europe

Bana Gora (CEO, Muslim Women’s Council) said: “This ruling is a violation of women’s rights and autonomy.

“Given the alarming rise in hate crimes, the timing of this ruling will only embolden growing far-right sentiment which has been resurrected since Brexit.

“Instead of focussing on the hijab, which has been so grossly dissected by the media and politicians alike, we must focus on the more pressing issues on our doorstep. The last thing we want to do is to alienate Muslim women who are already heavily disenfranchised.”   

FREEDOM: 2012 saw the first Sikh men given permission to wear turban in armed forces

FREEDOM: 2012 saw the first Sikh men given permission to wear turban in armed forces

 

Of course, the ban doesn’t just have implications for the female Muslim community; Sikh men who wear the turban may face persecution in the workplace now as a result of the ruling.

Only in 2012, were communities celebrating the first Sikh guardsman to be given permission to wear a turban instead of a bearskin while on duty outside Buckingham Palace. This ruling now threatens to undermine the progress made by a range of religious and minority groups to express their freedom in the workplace.

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