Tag Archive: Daesh

Jihadis jailed: Coventry trio face prison for trying to join Daesh

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JAILED: Ahmad Ismail (right), from Coventry, has been found guilty of terrorism offences along with two others - Aras Mohammed Hamid (left) and Shivan Hayder Azeez Zangana (middle)

JAILED: Ahmad Ismail (right), from Coventry, has been found guilty of terrorism offences along with two others - Aras Mohammed Hamid (left) and Shivan Hayder Azeez Zangana (middle)

On Tuesday 3rd January, three men, including one from Coventry, have been jailed for terrorism offences.

Two of the men were planning to travel to Iraq to engage in terrorism. One of them was arrested by counter terrorism officers hiding in the back of a lorry in Dover, as he attempted to leave the country undetected.

Aras Mohammed Hamid, aged 26, of no fixed address, was found guilty of two counts of preparing for acts of terrorism following trial at Kingston Crown Court in London.

The court heard he had been pivotal in planning for himself and another defendant to travel to the conflict zone and engage in acts of terrorism.

Hamid was also convicted of having a false Bulgarian passport; he had pleaded guilty to this offence at an earlier hearing. He was sentenced to seven years imprisonment.

Shivan Hayder Azeez Zangana, aged 21, from Washington Road, Sheffield, was convicted of one offence of preparing for acts of terrorism.

He had been in contact with Hamid about going to Iraq, before travelling from Sheffield to Birmingham, where he was arrested by officers from the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit (WMCTU).

Aziz had claimed that he wanted to go home to Iraq but evidence proved that he had, in fact, been radicalised by Hamid and his purpose for wanting to travel was to join Daesh.

Aziz was jailed for three years.

A third man, Ahmad Ismail, aged 19, from Portwrinkle Avenue, Coventry, was found guilty of failing to disclose information about the planned travel to the conflict zone.

The court heard that Ismail’s brother, Mohammed Ismail, travelled to Syria to fight with the Daesh in 2014 and Ahmad Ismail is believed to have originally intended to travel with Hamid and Aziz, but changed his mind after concerns over his brother’s status. T

he court heard the three were arrested in May 2016 by officers from WMCTU. Ismail received an 18 month sentence.

The investigation began, when a concerned relative of Aziz made a 999 call to police in South Yorkshire, claiming he had left his home in Sheffield and was planning to leave to join a terrorist organisation.

Another relative claimed Aziz had told people who was going to sacrifice himself to God. Worried relatives told officers Aziz’s behaviour had recently changed and he had stopped going out and listening to music and was only listening to readings from the Qur’an.

Following a police investigation, which discovered Aziz had travelled by train to Birmingham, officers arrested Aziz from a residential area above a mosque in Holyhead Road, Handsworth on 17th May last year.

Also at the Birmingham address was Hamid, a Kurdish asylum seeker, who had arrived in the country in September 2015.

Although he wasn’t arrested at this point, police seized some of Hamid’s property, including a mobile phone. As a result of this, officers discovered Hamid, using facilitators in Turkey, was arranging to travel to Iraq to fight for Salahaddin Battalion, a Kurdish group fighting for Daesh.

Evidence also found Aziz was also planning to travel to the conflict zone to fight and that Ismail was known about and discussed the travel. Aziz and Hamid had booked flights to Iraq through a travel agency in Birmingham.

After the arrest of Aziz, Hamid fled Birmingham and following enquiries, was arrested on 19th May 2016 in a lay-by hiding in a lorry, near to the Port of Dover. Officers discovered Hamid had sneaked into the back of the cab while the driver was asleep and was found lying behind pallets. Ismail was arrested by counter-terrorism officers on 22nd May 2016 at his home in Coventry.

Head of WMCTU, Chief Superintendent Sue Southern, said: “As a result of enquiries, counter-terrorism investigators discovered Hamid’s instrumental role in organising travel plans for himself and Aziz for preparation for acts of terrorism. We also uncovered examples of Hamid’s extreme ideology and radicalisation and the pivotal role he played in orchestrating the travel plans for himself and Aziz.

“Evidence shows Ismail, a local student, was in contact with Hamid and was well aware of plans to travel to the conflict zone.”


Anyone concerned about someone travelling to, or returning from, Syria or another conflict zone or is worried about someone showing signs of being radicalised should contact their local police on 101 or visit www.preventtragedies.co.uk to access relevant support and advice.


 

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Axis to Evil: Roadshow aims to dismantle lies of extremists

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WELL ATTENDED: The Axis to Evil events have been held throughout the UK, with crowds turning out to hear from the respected scholars

WELL ATTENDED: The Axis to Evil events have been held throughout the UK, with crowds turning out to hear from the respected scholars

A trio of respected faith leaders from across the UK continued on their ‘peace road trip’ earlier this month in an attempt to address the growing issues of young people becoming radicalised in the UK.

The ‘Axis to Evil’ roadshow was setup by the Suffah Foundation last year and is led by panellists, Imam Qari Asim, Dr Ather Hussain Al Azhari and Shaykh Umar Hayat Qadri.

With events taking place throughout the country, the group are aiming to raise awareness on how the actions which Daesh endorse are not allowed true to Islam, nor do they represent the true beliefs of Muslims.

Mohammad Shahid, from the Suffah Foundation, explained how important he believed the roadshow was for the benefit of all young people.

“It is apparent that the murderers and attackers, involved with these extremist groups, do not follow any particular faith since no faith, in particular Islam, endorses taking of innocent lives and causing corruption in the land,” he said.

“It is sometimes alleged that Daesh are Sunnis; but Daesh are not Sunnis. They do not believe in the fundamentals and Aqaid of Sunni Islam. They are simply Khawarij (‘those who went out’ the fold of Islam).

“The evidence shows that individuals who commit terrorist acts are neither inspired by Sunni scholars, nor do they belong to Sunni madrasahs.

“We Muslims, people of faith and no faith need to remain united against the modern-day terrorists to achieve peace in our time.”

Following events across Yorkshire and further afield, the roadshow pulled up in Warrington last week and was attended by a mixed audience that included a number of local Councillors, Police force and the Mayor of Warrington –Faisal Rashid.

As well as discussing false ideologies, the group of panellists also addressed the issue of online grooming.

Shaykh Umar spoke about the threat that internet access poses to vulnerable people

He said: “The Internet, in particular social media, is being used as a channel, not only to promote and engage, but also act as a command structure.  

“Often this promotion glorifies violence, attracting and influencing many people including children and in extreme cases radicalising them.”

Shaykh Umar went onto emphasise that parents in particular need to be vigilant about the activities their children are doing online; which videos do they watch; whose speeches do they listen to; who do they hang out with; and who are their friends.

The event concluded with a question and answer session where the local Councillors that were present asked numerous questions and in particular the worrying rise of Islamophobia and hate crime was discussed.

INFORMATIVE: Dr Hafiz Ather Hussain al-Azhari addresses the audience about the dangers of radicalisation

INFORMATIVE: Dr Hafiz Ather Hussain al-Azhari addresses the audience about the dangers of radicalisation

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The ‘voice’ of Peshmerga: Bradford teacher writes about life on the front line in the fight against Daesh

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DANGER: Despite receiving no pay for their fight with Daesh, Peshmerga forces continue to battle with their weapons

DANGER: Despite receiving no pay for their fight with Daesh, Peshmerga forces continue to battle with their weapons

A former Bradford Grammar School teacher has swapped the classroom for the frontline as he continues to document the fight against Daesh from the dangerous region of Kurdistan.

Having previously paid for his own ransom to escape AK-47 wielding militants, and received death threats from Saudi Arabia for his criticism of the House of Saud, Dr Simon Valentine is certainly no newcomer to danger, in fact he admits that he ‘thrives on it’.

“To know that I am somewhere that history is being made, to see it and document is something which gives me much greater pleasure than any nine-to-five job could ever do,” he said.

“I enjoy the excitement of researching and writing about such topics. In Kurdistan, the frontline against Daesh spans some 600 miles and I have travelled along most of that.”

Dr Valentine is currently working with the Peshmerga army in Kurdistan – the military of the autonomous region, roughly translated to ‘those who face death’.

He gained entry to the country via a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) qualification, and has lectured at Soran University and taught Kurdish children. It is on the front line, however, that the freelancer enjoys spending most of his time.

After being asked by military leaders to document their ongoing battles with the Daesh, Dr Valentine says he was eager to share some of the stories he has witnessed over the past two years.

FIRST HAND ACCOUNT: Dr Valentine has travelled almost 600 miles along the front line, speaking with Peshmerga foces for his upcoming book

FIRST HAND ACCOUNT: Dr Valentine has travelled almost 600 miles along the front line, speaking with Peshmerga foces for his upcoming book

He is now compiling a book about the things he has witnessed over the past two years in hope of shedding some light on the struggles of the Kurdish people.

“The reason why I’m writing this book is to be a voice for Peshmerga,” Dr Valentine said. “I live with the Peshmerga soldiers and they are good people. They are happy and resilient people.

“In Kurdish cultures there’s a saying - ‘Only the mountains are our friends’. Down through the years, fighting Saddam Hussain and other groups, they were on their own.

“Today, they are fighting Daesh like so many groups but still they receive no funding.

“Baghdad believes that if you give weapons, if you give money to the Kurds, they will eventually use it to gain independence and fight them.

“The billions of dollars that America, Britain and the Western World are giving to Baghdad is all for the Iraqi army. Very little is getting through to the Kurds. This is one of the reasons why I’m writing the book.

“Baghdad is supposed to give Kurdistan 17 per cent of the national budget. Two years ago, the Kurds were selling oil to Turkey and Baghdad didn’t like it. Since then, they haven’t given them a penny. One general told me ‘we are bleeding, we need help’.”

Since Daesh invaded Iraq two years ago, a reported 1,700 Peshmerga soldiers, including women, have been killed by the extremist group.

Although the Peshmerga have been forced to fight using weapons and tanks dated from as far back as World War Two – and don’t get paid for their efforts – Dr Valentine says they never back down from the fight and are ‘one of the world’s finest armies’.

“They are an inspirational group of people,” he added. “Over the past year, I’ve developed a network and I know most of the commanders and generals in Peshmerga.

“All that they ask for is a voice; someone to tell the world that they are struggling.”

DANGER: Despite receiving no pay for their fight with Daesh, Peshmerga forces continue to battle with their weapons

DANGER: Despite receiving no pay for their fight with Daesh, Peshmerga forces continue to battle with their weapons

Despite remaining optimistic about the destruction of Daesh, Dr Valentine says he is worried about the fate of the Kurds.

“Currently it is a case of ‘my enemy’s enemy is my friend’,” he said. “It is well known that the Kurds and the Iraqis don’t get along – Saddam Hussein wanted to eradicate the Kurds because he saw them as inferior.

“Right now, they have a common enemy and both want to see the destruction of Daesh. After that, only time will tell as to how Iraq and Kurdistan get along.”

He added: “Even after the war is finished, and the entity of Daesh is destroyed, there will sadly still be a lot of fighting in Iraq.

“There will not be peace for some time because of so many competing groups – the Shias the Sunnis, the Kurds, the Iraqis and the Arabs etc. They are all involved in disputes over territory.”

With more battles touted for the coming years, Dr Valentine remains committed to documenting the plight of the Kurdish people.

He wants to find out why Daesh came to such power and how their ‘misinterpretation of Islam has created an enemy for the world’.

“I am a Christian but I believe Islam to be a great religion, one which has contributed to our civilisation so much,” he said.

“Therefore, one of the questions I want to answer for myself is to what extent is Daesh a misrepresentation of Islam. I’ve interviewed Daesh prisoners and what they say is a total misrepresentation, a distortion of true Islamic teaching.

“We need to destroy the ideology as it is a threat, not only to Kurdistan, Iraq and the surrounding nations, but to the whole world.”

Dr Valentine is currently back in Bradford and is hoping to hear from Kurdish people about their experiences of Peshmerga. He can be contacted by email at archegos@btinternet.com

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Choudhary locked up: Hate preachers jailed for urging support of Daesh

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TERRORISM CHARGES: Anjem Choudhary was sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison alongside associate, Mizanur Rahman

TERRORISM CHARGES: Anjem Choudhary was sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison alongside associate, Mizanur Rahman

Britain’s best known Islamist hate preacher, Anjem Choudhary, has this week been jailed for five years and six months after being found guilty of encouraging support for Daesh.

After years of police struggles to pin charges on him, the 49-year-old was finally convicted on Tuesday 6th September alongside close associate, Mizanur Rahman, 33, who received the same sentence.

The pair were convicted by a jury in July of using the internet to urge their followers to back the banned group, which controls large areas of Syria and Iraq.

Dean Haydon, head of counter-terrorism at London's Metropolitan Police, said after the sentencing: “These men have stayed just within the law for many years and there has been frustration for both law enforcement agencies and communities as they spread hate.

“We have watched Choudary developing a media career as spokesman for the extremists, saying the most distasteful of comments, but without crossing the criminal threshold.”

Choudhary is well known in the UK and abroad for his outlandish comments, previously saying that he wanted to convert Buckingham Palace into a Mosque and supported Sharia law in the UK.

He refused to denounced attacks by Islamists, including bombings of the London transport system in 2005, and praised the men behind the 9/11 attacks on the United States. He had never been charged for terrorism offences.

Rahman meanwhile has previously served two years in jail after being found guilty of encouraging followers to kill British and US troops in Afghanistan and Iraq during a protest in 2006

His trial head that in postings on social media, both Choudhary and Rahman had pledged allegiance to the ‘caliphate’ declared by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and said Muslims had a duty to obey or provide support to him.

“Their recent speeches and the oath of allegiance were a turning point for the police - at last we had the evidence that they had stepped over the line and we could prove they were actively encouraging support of ISIS,” said Haydon.

After a four-week trial at London’s Old Bailey, the pair were convicted and finally sentenced this past week. Both had denied the charges against them.

Evidence presented at the trial included speeches carried out by Choudhary where he argued the points to recognise Al-Baghdadi as the leader of Daesh.

The court also heard how the two men had pledged allegiance to the terrorist group and entailed the help of convicted terrorist, Mohammed Fachry, to publish the oath on an Indonesian website.

“The jury were sure that you knowingly crossed the line between the legitimate expression of your own views and the criminal act of inviting support for an organisation which was at the time engaged in appalling acts of terrorism,” said the judge, Timothy Holroyde.

“You are both mature men and intelligent men who knew throughout exactly what you were doing.”

After their sentencing, Choudary’s supporters, who had gathered in the public gallery shouted: “Allahu Akbar” (God is greatest).

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“The whole strategy needs to be looked at”

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DETERRING TERRORISM: MP for Birmingham Perry Barr, Khalid Mahmood, is calling on the government’s ‘Channel’ programme to be made mandatory in an attempt to stop people being radicalised by extremist groups

DETERRING TERRORISM: MP for Birmingham Perry Barr, Khalid Mahmood, is calling on the government’s ‘Channel’ programme to be made mandatory in an attempt to stop people being radicalised by extremist groups

Anti-terrorism programme could be made ‘compulsory’

Nearly half of people assessed to be susceptible to Daesh terrorism refused the offer of help from the Government's flagship counter-extremism programme, latest figures have shown this week.

‘The Channel’ programme offers support and mentoring to those believed to be vulnerable to being lured into extremism, but it is voluntary and those offered help can turn it down.

Figures have now emerged from a Freedom of Information Act request, relating to a Home Office database, which state that during the last financial year, out of the 245 people offered support, some 117 refused it, according to the National Police Chiefs' Council.
Khalid Mahmood, the Labour MP for Birmingham Perry Bar, where a number of schools were targeted by hard-line Muslims in the Trojan Horse scandal, called for the Channel programme to be made ‘compulsory’.

He said: “The whole strategy needs to be looked at.”

Khalid then went on to say that some mentors are ‘non-violent radicalisers’ who ‘reinforce the ideology’ rather than countering it.

“Also what needs to be looked at is the fact that the number of Channel providers is very stagnant, there are hardly any changes in providers that the local police authorities use,” he continued.

He added: “I think it should become mandatory...but unless you have the right providers, unless you have people who are actually not going to reinforce that ideology, people who are actually trying to move people away from that ideology and the ethos of what they are being taught - that is the only way you will move forward and try to de-radicalise some of these people.

“And we are not doing that at the moment in Channel.”

He also called for more resources to be ploughed into the programme.

Channel aims to combat extremism early on to prevent people from becoming further radicalised and turning to violence.

Many people referred to the programme are children.

WORK TO BE DONE: Khalid believes the whole system needs looking at to address young people being radicalised. Pictured is Talha Aslam, who fled join Daesh from Dewsbury

WORK TO BE DONE: Khalid believes the whole system needs looking at to address young people being radicalised. Pictured is Talha Aslam, who fled join Daesh from Dewsbury

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Daesh child bomber: 51 dead at Turkish wedding party

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Turkish PM Erdogan addresses the media in Ankara

A suicide attack, which claimed 51 lives in the Turkish city of Gaziantep last weekend, was carried out by a child aged between 12 and 15, Turkey’s President Recep Erdogan said on Sunday.

Mr Erdogan said Daesh was behind the attack, which targeted a Kurdish wedding party near the Syrian border – an area which is known to have several terrorist cells.

In Saturday night’s attack, at least 69 people were injured, of which 17 were reportedly in a critical condition.

According to local news sources, the bride and groom — Besna and Nurettin Akdogan — were being treated in hospital but their lives ‘were not in danger’.

The bomber had targeted wedding guests as they danced in the street.

The city of 1.5 million was already on edge because of events in Syria, where Daesh has been battling Syrian Kurdish forces.

The choice of target seems designed for maximum impact: a ‘soft target’ of people enjoying a moment of a celebration at a wedding party.

If this was an attack by Daesh, it could be a response to the jihadists' recent loss of territory in Syria, where Kurdish fighters, with the US-led coalition, drove them out of a stronghold in Manbij.

The suicide blast comes as Turkey's President announces that his government will play a more active part in the Syrian conflict.

In a written statement published by local media, Mr Erdogan argued there was ‘no difference’ between Daesh, the Kurdish militants of the PKK, and followers of US-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom he blames for the coup attempt last month.

He said: “Our country and our nation have again only one message to those who attack us - you will not succeed.”

The bomb went off in a part of town popular with students and which has a large Kurdish community.

Recent deadly attacks on civilians in Turkey

20th August 2016: Bomb attack on wedding party in Gaziantep kills at least 51 people, Daesh suspected.

29th June 2016: A gun and bomb attack on Ataturk airport in Istanbul kills 41 people, in an attack blamed on Daesh militants.

13th March 2016: 37 people are killed by Kurdish militants in a suicide car bombing in Ankara

17th February 2016: 28 people, many of them civilians, are killed in an attack on a military convoy in Ankara

12th January 2016: 10 people, including at least eight German tourists, die in a suicide bombing in Istanbul, thought to have been carried out by Daesh

10th October 2015: More than 100 people die in a double suicide bombing at a Kurdish peace rally in Ankara - the deadliest attack of its kind on Turkish soil

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“Open the door of jihad in their land”

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MISSING: Iqbal was one of nine children, aged between three and 15, who are believed to have been taken to Syria to join Daesh

MISSING: Iqbal was one of nine children, aged between three and 15, who are believed to have been taken to Syria to join Daesh

Bradford Daesh teen urges Muslims to wage terror on UK

A 15-year-old schoolboy from Bradford - believed to be fighting with Daesh in Syria- has posted gun-toting pictures of himself on Facebook, alarming police and triggering fears that the terror outfit may be using him to lure other Western recruits.

Ibrahim Iqbal posted pictures of himself on the social media site, in full combat gear and holding an AK-47 last week.

The UK’s North East Counter Terrorism Unit said in a statement: “We are aware of posts made on social media. These are currently being reviewed to establish if any offences have been committed.”

FRIGHTENING: Ibrahim Iqbal has been posting pictures of himself on Facebook in full combat gear

FRIGHTENING: Ibrahim Iqbal has been posting pictures of himself on Facebook in full combat gear

Iqbal was only 14 when his mother took him and 11 other family members to Daesh-held territory from their Bradford home last year.

His mother, 35-year old Sugra Dawood, took Iqbal and her four other children.

She left Britain without her husband, Akhtar Iqbal, to join up with her jihadi brother, Ahmed.

Sugra was joined by her sisters Zohra Dawood, 33, and Khadija Dawood, 31, and their four children, making them the largest British family to join the extremist group.

Last year, her husband made an emotional plea to his eldest son Junaid to come back home.

Ishtiaq Ahmed, a spokesperson for Bradford Council for Mosques, said: “We are very concerned. If it is confirmed that these pictures are real, then it will raise additional alarm bells that young people are being used by Daesh to propagate their violent game and entice other young people from Britain to join.”

Iqbal, who was the only member of the family to be pictured in his Facebook post gear wrote: “First of all I say Alhamdulillah (praise be to God) Allah has brought me to the khilafah (caliphate) and saved me from the oppression of the Kuffar (unbeliever).

"Secondly, I say to all the Muslims that there is no land where you will be honoured except in the land of the khilafah and it is obligatory for every Muslim to come to the khilafah and pledge your allegiance to Amir al Mumineen (commander of the faithful) Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi and whoever does not then he dies the death of jaahiliyah (non-Muslims).

“Last of all, if the government closes the door of migrating to the khilafah then you open the door of jihad in their land.”

On Saturday, he took to Facebook again, writing: “Nobody has an excuse to be not fighting in the path of Allah. Physically fighting not in your mind as some stupid people say (sic).”

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France church attack: Daesh kill Catholic priest in a Normandy church

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BARBARIC ATTACK: Father Jacques Hamel was killed whilst he was performing mass in the suburb of Rouen

BARBARIC ATTACK: Father Jacques Hamel was killed whilst he was performing mass in the suburb of Rouen

France is still reeling after an 86-year-old Catholic priest was killed - and four other people taken hostage - by two armed men who stormed a Normandy church in a suburb of Rouen, in northern France.

The attack, on 26th July, is the latest in a string of deadly assaults in Europe, including a massacre in the southern French city of Nice on Bastille Day, and five incidents in Germany.

Officials say the two attackers, who said they were from Daesh, slit Father Jacques Hamel's throat during a morning Mass.

One of four people taken hostage - said to be an elderly parishioner - suffered severe knife wounds and remains in a critical condition in hospital.

ALLEGIANCE TO DAESH: Most of the photos on Adel Kermiche’s Facebook page show him as a younger youth

ALLEGIANCE TO DAESH: Most of the photos on Adel Kermiche’s Facebook page show him as a younger youth

Police surrounded the church and shot dead both hostage-takers. French media named them as 18-year-old Adel Kermiche and 19-year-old Abdel Malik Petitjean.

Following the attack, Daesh released a video of what it said were the two men pledging allegiance to the group.

Both men were known to the security services and one was reportedly wearing an electronic monitoring tag as part of his bail conditions. 

Adel Kermiche is reported to have been in custody and then placed under a control order, and had also tried to enter Syria twice.

The attack happened during morning Mass, situated in the tranquil square of St-Etienne-du-Rouvray.

Sister Danielle, a nun, said she was inside the church during the attack.

She told French media: “They forced Father Hamel to his knees. He wanted to defend himself, and that's when the tragedy happened.

“They recorded themselves. They did a sort of sermon around the altar, in Arabic. It's a horror.”

She said she managed to escape as they were preparing to kill him.

Father Jacquest Hamel has been described as ‘devoted’ to his parish and was well-known in the town, engaging with everybody.

President Francois Hollande, visiting the scene in Saint Etienne-du-Rouvray, said the attackers had committed a ‘cowardly assassination’ and France would fight Daesh ‘by all means’.

Pope Francis was shocked at the ‘pain and horror of [the] absurd violence’.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May said the attack was ‘sickening’ and offered her condolences to the people of France.

 

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A matter of expression: BBC should use ‘Daesh’ instead of ‘so-called Islamic State’

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GIVING UNWARRANTED STATUS: Labour MP, Andy Burnham, has criticised the BBC’s use of words to describe the jihadist militant group

GIVING UNWARRANTED STATUS: Labour MP, Andy Burnham, has criticised the BBC’s use of words to describe the jihadist militant group

Muslim leaders believe the BBC is making it harder for them to counter radicalisation by referring to ‘so-called Islamic State’ when referencing their activities, Labour MP Andy Burnham has reiterated this week.

The Shadow Home Secretary and Labour candidate for Mayor of Greater Manchester renewed pressure on the broadcaster to use Daesh as an alternative description of the terror group, which rose to prominence after seizing large areas of Syria and Iraq in 2014.

He insisted the broadcaster’s current description gives a ‘status’ to the radical militant group, which refers to itself as Islamic State, that it does not deserve.

Home Office minister, John Hayes, said the use of the term ‘so-called’ for organisations creates ‘entirely the wrong impression’, as he vowed to telephone and write to the BBC asking for change.

Speaking in the Commons, Mr Burnham said: “I know the BBC has taken to using the phrase 'so-called Islamic State'. In my view, that is not helpful.

“The use of the word 'so-called' does not undermine the following words 'Islamic' or 'State' but these are the two words that the public hears.

“It gives a status to this organisation that they don't deserve and also it makes it sound as though they are an authorised branch of Islam.

“I would urge the BBC director general to review this editorial decision and to move, as the Government has done, to the use of the title Daesh.”

Mr Burnham later told Mr Hayes: “I've been in mosques recently where, I can say, it causes a great despondency amongst people there working to try and counter radicalisation.

“They say that the use of the word 'so-called' does not undermine 'Islamic' nor the word 'state' and the BBC repeating this is only making their job harder and they feel very strongly about this.”

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Daesh breaks ceasefire: 150 killed near Syria’s coastline

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CONCERNED: Secretary General of the UN, Ban Ki-moon, voiced concern about the military escalation in and around Damascus

CONCERNED: Secretary General of the UN, Ban Ki-moon, voiced concern about the military escalation in and around Damascus

Ban Ki-moon, the UN Secretary General, has condemned recent attacks by Daesh after nearly 150 people were killed on Syria’s Mediterranean coast.

The state media has said that at least 200 more people were wounded on Monday in the government-controlled northern cities of Tartus and Jableh – areas which host Russian military bases.

Daesh claimed responsibility for the attacks, saying they were targeting members of President Bashar al-Assad's Alawite minority.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said at least five suicide bombers and two devices planted in cars were the cause of the carnage.

Russia’s Ministry of Defence has called for a temporary truce to begin in two Syrian towns.

A ceasefire has been in place in Syria since February and UN talks involving Russia, the US, Syria and European and regional officials have been ongoing since.

The talks aim to find a political solution for the crisis.

Daesh itself is not part of the talks and operations against them have continued.

State television reported that the Syrian Foreign Ministry sent a letter to the United Nations, saying the blasts were a ‘dangerous escalation by the hostile and extremist regimes in Riyadh, Ankara and Doha’, referring to support given to the rebels by Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Qatar.

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Baghdad bomber is from British soil: Huddersfield origins for Daesh militant

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IDENTIFIED: A Daesh militant killed in a suicide bomb in Baghdad has been recognised by his family in Huddersfield

IDENTIFIED: A Daesh militant killed in a suicide bomb in Baghdad has been recognised by his family in Huddersfield

A British Daesh fighter, killed in a suicide attack in Iraq, is reported to be a 27-year-old Yorkshireman from Huddersfield who previously attended Bradford College.

The man, fighting under the nom du guerre Abu Musa al-Britani, is believed to be Mohammed Rizwan Awan, as reported by the BBC.

It is understood that, in early 2015, Awan and his wife left their family in the UK, telling them that they were moving to Saudi Arabia.

However, when images of the latest Daesh suicide bomber were circulated, the Awan family said they ‘knew in their hearts’ it was their son.

Daesh social media accounts confirmed the death, in the al-Anbar province west of Iraqi capital Baghdad, and claimed ‘nearly 30’ people died in the blast.

Awan's family told the Daily Mail that their relative showed no signs of radicalisation before he disappeared in May 2015 and that he was a ‘bright, educated young man’.

Whilst in the UK, Awan worked for British Gas in Leeds and was once violently attacked as an innocent bystander in a gang war when he was 18.

Archived media reports describe how he was appallingly attacked by a man with a machete and suffered nine wounds to his body, according to the Huddersfield Daily Examiner.

He was one of five suicide bombers who rammed explosives-laden vehicles into a military checkpoint.

While Daesh themselves claimed 30 Iraqi soldiers died in the attack, a military spokesperson confirmed six dead and nine injured.

According to a statement by the jihadist group in which it claimed responsibility for the attack, several foreigners were among the terrorists, including the Briton.

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Bombing Beatles identified

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DISTINCTIVE ACCENTS: Aine Davis’ photograph was found on the phone of his wife, Amal El-Wahabi

DISTINCTIVE ACCENTS: Aine Davis’ photograph was found on the phone of his wife, Amal El-Wahabi

Two members of Daesh have been named

The terrorist group, Daesh, fronted by ‘Jihadi John’, have had two of their English members identified.

Dubbed ‘The Beatles’ by their captors because of their distinctive English accents, they have now been officially named as Aine Davis and Alexanda Kotey.

Before making their way to Syria, the pair, ‘George’ and ‘Ringo’, purportedly grew up in West London.

The most violent of the pair is called ‘George’.

Mohammed Emwazi – who is known by the moniker Jihadi John – was filmed beheading at least four Westerners including Britons David Haines and Alan Henning last year.

A US drone strike in the Syrian city of Raqqa killed Emwazi in November, confirmed by the January issue of the militant group’s magazine, ‘Dabiq’.   All remaining members of the group, are among the world’s most wanted men.

Thirty-two-year-old extremist, Kotey, also known as Alexe, has previously been named as a key conspirator with Emwazi.

Raised as a Greek Orthodox Christian, by a Greek-Cypriot mother and Ghanaian father, he grew up in Shepherd's Bush, before converting to Islam as a teen.

Kotey is believed to have been a key recruiter for the terror group and helped radicalise young men in London before travelling to Syria.

Buzzfeed spoke to a former friend of Kotey who said he used to run a stall outside his local mosque.

The friend said: “Those guys used to openly preach and argue about what they thought was their cause or ideology.”

Kotey is said to have fled Britain in 2009, leaving his two children behind, when he travelled to the Gaza Strip on an aid convoy of 110 vehicles organised by London mayoral candidate and former Bradford West MP George Galloway.

A spokesman for the then Respect MP said Mr Galloway had not heard Kotey's name until press reports emerged, although he accepted that there were around 500 people on the convoy and it was ‘entirely possible that they could have been on that trip, but George just doesn't know the name’.

Davis, who was born in London but has roots in Gambia, is believed to have attended the same mosque as Emwazi and Kotey, which was the Al-Manaar mosque in London.

ITV news reported that all three men were marginalised sometime in 2011 for views of an extremist nature. Davis left the UK in 2013 to become a guard for Daesh.

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