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The search continues

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More than three months have passed since the mysterious disappearance of Malaysian Airline flight MH370, and now the search is being moved to a new area.

The next phase of the search will move hundreds of miles south in the Indian Ocean, with the initial suspected crash site deemed too far north after recent analysis.

Martin Dolan, chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said a statement will be issued later this week as to where a new 23,000 mile search of the ocean floor for wreckage will be focussed.

MISSING: The Malaysian Airline flight MH370 has been missing since 8th March with search crews still scouring the vast Indian Ocean

MISSING: The Malaysian Airline flight MH370 has been missing since 8th March with search crews still scouring the vast Indian Ocean

Having previously used an underwater drone to cover 330 square miles at the initial area, believed to be the crash site, more powerful sonar equipment will now be used.

Mr Dolan explained why the search was moving and the latest developments in the well-documented case.

“All the trends of this analysis will move the search area south of where it was,” he said. “Just how much south is something that we're still working on.

“There was a very complex analysis and there were several different ways of looking at it. Specialists have used several different methodologies and bringing all of that work together to get a consensus view is what we're finalising at the moment.”

Two survey ships are currently mapping seabeds, previously uncharted around the new search zone, before the latest solar scanning can take place, expected to start in August.

The new search area is in the vast expanse of ocean which was previously scoured by search aircraft in the days and weeks following the initial disappearance.

Although no debris was found on them occasions, Mr Dolan hopes the new technology can provide a more conclusive search.

The area, just off the west Australian coast, will be analysed using technology which can scan depths of 4.3miles in the ocean and is expected to take 12 months to complete.

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