Crowds turnout to pay respects in Leeds


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PROUD: Stakes with poppies attached were sold by the Royal British Legion as a way of allowing different faith groups to pay their respects to fallen soldiers

PROUD: Stakes with poppies attached were sold by the Royal British Legion as a way of allowing different faith groups to pay their respects to fallen soldiers

Towns and cities across the country fell silent on Armistice Day last week as the nation paid its respects to its fallen soldiers.

On Wednesday 11th November, the traditional two-minute silence was observed to mark the end of the First World War and to honour those who have died in conflict ever since.

Following on from Remembrance Sunday services, Armistice Day is often seen as a more private, reflective time, away from the larger public gatherings.

In Leeds, a well attended event was once again seen on Sunday 8th November, with ex-service men and women joining current serving military organisations outside Leeds City Museum.

Crowds then joined the gathering as they marched to the city’s war memorial where poppy wreaths were laid on behalf of the city’s residents.

POPPY: Raman Singh laid a poppy wreath in Leeds on behalf of the city’s Sikh community

POPPY: Raman Singh laid a poppy wreath in Leeds on behalf of the city’s Sikh community

Amongst those paying their respects were Balbir Singh and Raman Singh who laid a poppy wreath on behalf of the city’s Sikh community.

Prior to the occasion, the pair had helped distribute Sikh poppy stakes for the Royal British Legion which acknowledge the war efforts of Sikh soldiers in the two World Wars.

Speaking prior to the event, Balbir said: “These [poppy] sticks give followers of all religions the chance to show their respects alongside their faith.

“I have seen a record amount of poppies this year and it is a huge sign of respect.

“The sticks have grown in popularity every year since they were first made available and it is a fantastic way of seeing how different communities are coming together for this one day.

“We must remember the efforts of so many soldiers, and so many Sikhs, in the war and the sacrifice they made.”

The Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Judith Chapman added: “Remembrance Sunday is a time where individually and as city we can come together as one and pay our respects to those people who lost their lives during times of conflict.

“The service at the war memorial on Victoria Gardens is always a very moving and poignant occasion, and we...say thank you to all those who made the ultimate sacrifice serving their country.”

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