Fundamentalist literature


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An Islamic primary school in Luton has been slammed by the education watchdog after books were found at the site which promoted stoning, lashing and execution.

During their most recent visit to Olive Tree Primary School, Ofsted officials deemed the school to be ‘inadequate’ after finding library books containing fundamentalist views which ‘had no place in British society’.

The review, carried out by Ofsted officials, was cancelled half way through after parents complained that their children had been asked about homosexuality, yet the regulatory body insisted that they had already gathered enough evidence to produce a full report.

BANNED: Books which contained fundamentalist views were found at Olive Tree Primary School during an Ofsted inspection in May

BANNED: Books which contained fundamentalist views were found at Olive Tree Primary School during an Ofsted inspection in May

Inspectors wrote that pupils' “contact with different cultures, faiths and traditions is too limited to promote tolerance and respect for the views, lifestyles and customs of other people.”

However, Mr Farasat Latif, chairman of governors, said he rejected the findings and said his school does have literature from different faiths.

He said: “Ofsted came into the school looking for problems of extremism and intolerance and didn't find any.
“They carried out a half-baked inspection, which they abandoned half-way through.

“We are the victims of the extreme politics of Michael Gove whose ignorance of Islam is matched by his hostility. Many Muslims will feel alienated and victims of state Islamaphobia.

“We are a small school with 65 children and got 100 per cent on our SATS last year. We are involved with charities, like Dr Barnados which is not a Muslim charity.

“We have a large number of books about different faiths, which inspectors failed to notice, including The Diary of Ann Frank.”

He added that the school would consider taking legal action against the report and were waiting to hear if they would be put into special measures.

The Department for Education said the school would now have to produce an action plan to address the issues raised and would ‘not hesitate to take tough action if required’.

The school, which teaches boys and girls aged five to 11 years and shares its premises with a mosque, was last inspected by Ofsted in November 2005.

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