A ‘No’ to Mango


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The European Union’s decision to ban the import of Indian Mangoes for 20 months has been criticised by the country who insist they have addressed any issue with previous shipments.

New Delhi have officially appealed the decision after being informed that shipments of premium Alphonso mangoes would be blocked from May, through to December 2015, after consignments infested with fruit flies were found in Brussels.

The UK currently imports a total of 56,205 tonnes of mangoes per year, of which 4,816 tonnes, 8.5per cent, come from India.

It may not be the biggest trade in the world, but for many people it is their livelihood and by stopping the trade it is likely to affect many stakeholders at production levels.

STOPPED: The EU will not import any more mangoes from India until December 2015 unless an appeal is approved

STOPPED: The EU will not import any more mangoes from India until December 2015 unless an appeal is approved

Ajay Sahai, director general of the Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO), a body affiliated with the trade ministry, argued that the decision was a harsh one and believes it should be overturned.

“Since we got to know about the issue in March, we've put in place an elaborate examination and certification procedure that addresses the issue raised by the EU,” he said .

The FIEO and the trade ministry have asked Brussels to lift the ban, whilst local prices of mangoes have fallen by approximately 15 per cent in the past few days affecting farmers across the country, Sahai added.

The Middle East buys 80 percent of mango exports from India, the world's biggest producer of the fruit, accounting for about half of global output.

Asia, excluding India, accounts for more than a third of world mango output.

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